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Copyright and wording for stamps on back of photos

Keith Brumwell , Sep 20, 1998; 11:24 a.m.

I would like to purchase a stamp so I can stamp the back of photographs. I know I should have the copyright symbol but what else should I have on it. Do photo labs and stores honor it, I have the feeling some of my customers get the 4 x 6 print I give them and go to their local photo machine or lab and get cheeper copies and enlargements made. (Presently I do not stamp the back of the photos.) I probably shouldn't give them a photo but have them choose from the 4 x 6 and get the print back any suggestions will be appreciated. Thanks, Keith

Responses


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Doni Scheindlin , Sep 20, 1998; 11:49 a.m.

A copyright symbol or the word copyright with your name and the year(optional). You could also put "all rights reserved" as an added reminder. I also include a phone number so whoever has the photo can contact me. Any photo lab, printer, etc., should honor the copyright. I don't know if this means that they all do, but I know that the professional labs I deal with are very clear about it.

Gary Watson , Sep 20, 1998; 03:34 p.m.

Keith: With respect, just what purpose is served by having this info on the "back" of the print? If the issue is really a concern, get your name and copyright claim on the front of the photo. If the customer gripes, they can pay for one without it. Duplication is far too easy now not to consider it. Ask your lab if the can help with this. Or do your own Epson output with the copyright data.

Charles F. Barbour , Sep 20, 1998; 11:25 p.m.

The best information I have is that it should read: Copyright(the symbol is supposed to be better, for some reason)199*, John Doe, All Rights Reserved. Supposedly the copyright symbol has more wieght internationally, although I don't know why.

Ellis Vener , Sep 20, 1998; 11:52 p.m.

Keith, try this it works for me. I get calls from labs on a regular basis asking for copyright releases. For slides I use: (c) 1998, Ellis Vener (713) XXX-XXXX All Rights Reserved. For prints: (c) 1998, Ellis Vener (713) XXX-XXXX All Rights Reserved, No Reproduction Without Written Authorization of course this won't stop unscrupulous people from being true to their evil selves, but I have never had a problem from good clients when I do this.

Ellis Vener , Sep 21, 1998; 12:30 a.m.

Lemme try this again: Keith, try this it works for me. I get calls from labs on a regular basis asking for copyright releases.

For slides I use:

(c) 1998, Ellis Vener (713) XXX-XXXX All Rights Reserved.

For prints: (c) 1998, Ellis Vener (713) XXX-XXXX All Rights Reserved, No Reproduction Without Written Authorization

Of course this won't stop unscrupulous people from being true to their evil selves, but I have never had a problem from good clients when I do this.

Ron Gemeinhardt , Sep 21, 1998; 12:51 a.m.

Also worthy of note in the useful-copyright-notice-trivia department:

The copyright symbol: &copy;<br> Is <i>not</i> the same as: (C) or (c), the common shorthand in non-typeset usage.

According to the website for the Library of Congress, which registers copyright in the US, that not aware of anyone who has ever bothered to challenge the validity of the latter in any infringement proceedings, but they do caution that the symbol is the "official" usage. (Something to do with treaties on copyright, establishing &copy; as a language-independent symbol that encapsulates the internationally-accepted legal concepts.)

Bizarre, no? :-)

Ellis Vener , Sep 21, 1998; 12:58 a.m.

Okay third time, and I give up after this. For slides I use:

(c) 1998, Ellis Vener

(713) XXX-XXXX

All Rights Reserved.

For prints:

(c) 1998, Ellis Vener

(713) XXX-XXXX

All Rights Reserved, No Reproduction

Without Written Authorization

Robert Biddle , Sep 21, 1998; 01:26 a.m.

As noted above, use of the international copyright symbol " ) " in your copyright notice is the best way to go if you are concerned about copyright protection throughout the world. With this in mind, you may want to also consider including verbage to denote that you are expressly reserving all rights on a "worldwide" basis.

example:

) M. Author, 1998. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WORLDWIDE. NOT TO BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT EXPRESS WRITTEN AUTHORIZATION.

Keep in mind that the copyright notice alone will NOT stop someone intent on copying your work. HOWEVER, use of the proper copyright notice will provide you a better basis for seeking damages/redress if you should ever become aware of an infringement of your copyright. Further, I personally believe that the notice will go a long way toward stopping otherwise good/honest people from unknowingly infringing your copyright.

jon renner , Sep 21, 1998; 02:45 a.m.

Be catreful, however, in the inking selection. It is very possible to ruin prints with ink that takes 24 hrs to dry. Using a plain paper lable and then your stamp may save you a print or two.


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