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Is ESP metering similar to spot metering in the Olympus OM-PC ?

Tim Chakravorty , Dec 28, 2000; 05:57 p.m.

The Olympus Om-PC(40) has two metering modes- center weighted averaging (OTF) and ESP (Electro Selective Pattern). In the latter case the camera measures the intensity at the center of the frame and around the edges seperately. If there is a significant difference then it selects/recommends a shutter speed that will compensate(the center) to give middle gray. On the other hand if the scene is average it just uses regular center weighted averaging to determine exposure. ESP therefore sounds very much like spot meterig the center..or does it ? Anyone familiar with this model ? Thanks.

Responses

MM Sparks , Dec 29, 2000; 10:23 a.m.

You've described the ESP function well. It's more akin to matrix metering than spot; the center area measured by the secondary mirror is very large. The OM-2S has a similar exposure system, but the center metered area is small enough to be called "spot" by the manufacturer, but too big for those used to a narrow reading with a true spot meter.

Also, the default "Auto" setting isn't "center weighted averaging" in the way that most other SLR's of the period are. The random pattern on the shutter curtain seems to give the same reflectance across the frame when that method is used (unlike the first OM-2's) and I'm guessing the OTF autoexposure with slower speeds gives a similar reading.

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