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Can flatbed scanner with transparency adapter do this...?

Jeff Greenberg , Feb 18, 1999; 02:29 p.m.

If I place several - say 8, 12, or 16 - mounted labeled 35mm slides on flatbed scanner with transparency adapter option, can I get both the image & the label with printed caption in one scan? Or would I have to first scan for images & do 2nd scan for labels & then stitch 2 scans together to make one scan? The results would be for initial review of subject matter from a website. I may also get dedicated scanner for publishable individual scans.

Have read archives about UMAX Astra series vs. HP 6200 series vs. etc. Those postings a year old. What are current flatbed scanner- transparency option favorites?

Responses

Jamie Curtis , Feb 18, 1999; 06:45 p.m.

You'll be compromising the focus on either the label, or the image.

For an initial review, it would be significantly faster to just scan for the image.

If you are going to break the images apart, label them in HTML.

If you're not going to greak them apart, quickly mask the image areas, fill with a solid color, and use your text tool to ad a simple label. Since your are doing a quick review simple a,b,c 1,2,3 etc should suffice.

Even though scanner technology has improved sigificantly, for anything published, you are far, far better off with a Pro PCD scan.

James Rosenberg , Feb 18, 1999; 11:49 p.m.

Jeff: It appears from this and your previous postings that your goal is to have a first class web page, great images, and to be able to charge fees that reflect your work and ability.

As I see it you want to do all of this without paying someone who has the same expertise as in the; ' How do I do this category'.

Pardon me if I am wrong; However I feel that sometimes it is best to consult experts, and pay them for their knowledge.

James

Jeff Greenberg , Feb 19, 1999; 01:48 a.m.

I pardon you for being wrong & making false assumptions. How about responses that are informational, not judgemental. If the Monitor can remove previous posting & this one, too, please do so.

Scott Eaton , Feb 19, 1999; 09:49 a.m.

>>What are current flatbed scanner- transparency option favorites? <<

None.

If you want to scan film buy a film scanner. Even if you could manage to disable the scanning light you would still need two passes get both transparency information and reflective.

As for dedicated flatbeds UMAX seems to be the popular favorite on the MAC side. For Win95/98 I'm partisan towards the HP with USB.

//scott

Alan Gibson , Feb 19, 1999; 10:28 a.m.

To make it look good, you could do a flat-bed scan of the 'page' of mounted transparencies, and combine this with film-scans made from the actual trannies, i.e. re-sample the Photo CD (or whatever) images, and 'paint' those into the full-page scan. For web-pages, I would expect that any flat-bed scanner would do the job.

David Spratte , Feb 19, 1999; 02:59 p.m.

Scott was right, you will have to do two passes to collect both kind of information (reflective and transparent). Having worked in electronic prepress and graphic design, I would recommend setting the frame information and only using the scanner for the slide. Scanning for only the image allows you to concentrate on that aspect alone.

In short, use the best tool for the job.

This site has some helpful information on preparing/adjusting your images from Photo CD, this same information on adjustments will apply to scans you make yourself.

Good luck!

Steve Bingham , Feb 21, 1999; 11:02 a.m.

Jeff,

I don't know how fast you type, but I would suggest scanning the page of slides into Photoshop and simply type in the slide information. Your borders will all be solid black from the backlit scan so using a small font and white as your font color you could make these slides quite professional looking. Hope this helps.

Steve Bingham

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