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How to put my logo or copyright info on a photo?

Rachel Dean , Sep 27, 2010; 06:36 p.m.

Hi all, I'm new to this, but need to know how to get my logo and information on a digital image? I use Photoshop Elements....Thanks in advance!
Rachel

Responses

Mukul Dube , Sep 27, 2010; 08:15 p.m.

There's two approaches to this, and you can use either one or both. One is to embed IPTC metadata into the photo file itself. This will not be visible on the photo but can be viewed with software that supports it. The other option is to have a not too intrusive but visible overlay on the photo, something short like "(c) Rachel Dean". For this you must work on a copy so that the original is not affected. I do not know if these things can be done with Photoshop Elements.

Kris Bochenek , Sep 27, 2010; 08:24 p.m.

I use photoshop to put the © on my pictures. Here's how I do it. Open a photo in photoshop choose type tool from the pallet on the left and select an area where you want to type hold ALT key and type in 0169 this will give you © sign then type in your name or company name and click the tick and you are done. The signature will be created as another layer so you can move it as you wish. Then Merge down the layers and done.

JDM von Weinberg , Sep 27, 2010; 09:28 p.m.

Just be aware that anything you can put onto the picture can be removed or edited out by someone else if they take the trouble. One of the safer ways to post on line is to post only "Save for Web and Devices" small files of small dimensions. That makes it much harder for someone else to use the file for anything but web display.
Like "safe sex," the only way to be 100% safe is not to do it at all. You have to decide what level of risk you will accept to get your images out there for others to see.

Some people put such intrusive markers on their pictures as to make you wonder why they bother to post at all.


too much watermark?

Ken Papai , Sep 28, 2010; 02:39 p.m.

JDM -- very subtle and impressive. LOL.

And yes, similar to others -- Alt-169 for the © and then your Text (always a new, its own layer). Then I change the test layer's opacity to something between 20 and 40 %. (this might stray a little off the Beginners forum)

PSE may be slightly different than my PS workflow.

Ken Papai , Sep 28, 2010; 04:51 p.m.

((... Alt © 0169 (zero-one-six-nine on the keypad) for the © character. quickly...))

Here it is: reduced to 600 px wide and saved about 80KB in filesize.
Copyright Text is black at 20% layer opacity.


At this morning's sunrise... Moon and Rocketship

Marshall Goff , Sep 29, 2010; 10:14 a.m.

I recently saw a site by someone who watermarks all of their pictures with a bright, white watermark, quite large, which says "Watermark". I wish I were kidding.

JDM von Weinberg , Sep 29, 2010; 03:36 p.m.

Obviously, Ken's 'watermark' could easily be edited out, but what putting in such a mark does do is to make the 'pirate' user have to commit the overt act of doing so, which makes it very difficult for them to argue that "they didn't know' it was protected.

On the Macintosh keyboard, an 'option-g' brings up the © character.

J. Harrington USA (Massachusetts) , Oct 01, 2010; 05:46 p.m.

Rachel, I created an action in photoshop to resize, create a border and add my contact / copyright info all with one keystroke. I'm not sure if Elements can do "actions."

Here is an example in a portrait I made.

JC Uknz , Oct 02, 2010; 07:36 p.m.

Since it is so easy to remove these additions I suggest that you do not disfigure your photos.
Copyright exists the moment you take the photo ... it is your creation ... and a sign merely discourages the honest person and the dishonest is probably skilled enough to remove your additions. I have done it to confirm my opinion on this and then deleted my piracy. If you don't want your work endangered then don't post on the web or else post at a small size, 50Mb is more than ample for the average monitor full size 'view' mode. and 25Mb for pictures with emails.
But with interpolation tools it is often quite easy to boost the pixel count so the pirates can win whatever we do ... sad to say.
PS .. it is safer to work on a copy of your file but not really necessary if you have you wits about you and ALWAY use the 'copy as' tool rather than the 'copy' tool. Copy as asks you for a file name and you simply add a number or letter to the file name and you have both original file and the worked on copy saved under their respective names. Unless I know what I am doing I never, but never, use the copy tool and alway copy as ... it is so much safer :-)

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