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Edit flyaway hairs out pics like this one?

C. S. , Apr 12, 2011; 12:45 p.m.

I am trying to figure out how to get flyaway hairs out of photos like this one. I have tried to find tutorials but I can't seem to find exactly what I am looking for. To hide the hairs, I have tried the clone stamp tool, but it does not seem to blend very well (even though I have tried using the small, soft brushes). Is there a way to copy a segment of the picture and paste it over them? What is the best way? Thanks in advance!
p.s. (any other constructive advice about the photo is welcomed and much appreciated too!)


flyaway hair edits?

Responses

Ellis Vener , Apr 12, 2011; 01:34 p.m.

the spot healing tool in Photoshop CS 4 and CS 5, when used carefully is terrific for this.

C. S. , Apr 12, 2011; 01:54 p.m.

Oh...by the way,- I have Photoshop Elements 9. I have tried the spot healing tool, but it doesn't dissolve the flyaway hairs, especially if they are blonde and the background is dark, or if the hairs are in front of the face. I didn't pick a good picture to demonstrate this out of this set of pictures, but it was a problem with this girl during this shoot. The pictures turned out great, but I feel like the blonde individual, out-of-place hairs detract from them.


hair

Scott Ferris , Apr 12, 2011; 02:38 p.m.

C.S.

Does Elements have blending modes? These four videos are very good.

David Haas , Apr 12, 2011; 07:29 p.m.

Spot healing in elements 9 is a bit flaky - CS5's is definitely better - I'd suggest cloning - but do a selection first to minimize the chance of damaging the face -

Scott - without looking (i'm not on "My" computer) I'm not 100% certain - but I'm going with no...at least not full featured.

Dave

Richard Snow , Apr 13, 2011; 09:18 a.m.

Flyaway hair is most easily fixed as described above in Photoshop CS4/5

Alternatively in CS5 you can use the content aware healing tools, but it will be a bit flaky with hair.

In PS elements I'm not sure there is a simple way to remove them.

As for a quick advise about the first photo, (since you already said the second wasn't a good shot):

#1 - Since this post is in regards to flyaway hairs...when shooting girls, hairspray and a comb/brush is something useful to have on hand. She may not want to use it, but if you emphasize that her photos will come out better if you could get rid of the flyaways before-hand, she may take to the idea.

#2 - I'm not sure if it was the "look" you were going for, but I would have positioned the young lady in the photo so you could see here face more clearly. The "hair in the face" look seems to be in with HS/College students right now, but most will not choose a photo with their hair in their face when given the choice of a shot where their face is clearly visible. Additionally, it looks like the girl is talking in the tulip shot...she should be smiling!

#3 - Be very careful with your focus. It seems like in your first shot the pink tulip is in focus and the young lady's face is just out of focus. Focus on your subject's EYES. (Yet another reason to keep her hair out of her face.)

#4 - If possible, go for just a bit shallower DOF. The tulips are very pink and, IMHO, just a bit distracting. I really like the concept of the shot, but would have shot with a slightly wider aperture to blur out the tulips just a bit more.

Thats all, just a bit of technique work, (and a better angle on the girl's face), and you'd have a great image.

RS

Patrick Lavoie , Apr 13, 2011; 01:13 p.m.

fly away hairs like in your example are easier fix with a small brush, on a high zoom level like 100%-200%.. in most case, the stamp tool is a better tool due to the many different shade and texture.. but a combo of both tool, starting with the stamp tool then you refine in need the texture with the healing brush tool.. the spot healing tool work like s*** most of the time if you are not over a plain background.

Harry Joseph , Apr 13, 2011; 09:26 p.m.

If you are not doing it now, maybe you need to blow up your picture by 200% or more, that way you it would be easier to use the clone, or healing brush tools.

Jim Manganella , Apr 15, 2011; 05:30 a.m.

Don't you just love the honesty that comes from a camera. There's only so much you can do with what you have to work with. The truth is a bottle of damage control hair conditioner would solve most the problems.

Cynthia Gillespie , Apr 21, 2011; 09:03 a.m.

Believe it or not... there is a cheap program called portrait professional that does an AMAZINGLY great job on the fly away hair issue. I encounter this a lot with blonds and for the 29. or 39. it's well worth it just for the hair!

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