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How do I get grainy pictures ?

Thomas Bergh , Oct 26, 2001; 06:52 a.m.

Hi ! I want to get grainy pictures without big enlargements 10/15 cm. and using the whole negative. I´ve tried Tmax 3200 35mm in rodinal 1/50 20° C 16 min. This method was recommended to me but I didn`t find the grain large enough. Is there any way to get large grain on small prints?

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Volker Schier , Oct 26, 2001; 09:06 a.m.

The combination I commonly used for this purpose was Fomapan T800 (which was also sold as Paterson Acupan 800) in R09 1:20. Unfurtonately the T800 is no longer made. Try TRIX in Rodinal 1:10 or R09 1:20, this should give the effect you are looking for, or -- even better -- Forte 400 or Foma 400. The results are tack sharp but VERY grainy.

Ed Buffaloe , Oct 26, 2001; 09:12 a.m.

The small prints caveat is the problem. Your best bet might be to try printing only a small portion of your 35mm negative. You could also use a Minox sub-miniature or half-frame 35mm camera. Or you could try pushing Tri-X in Dektol, but in a small print I fear you would still have finer grain than you are seeking. Finally, you could try to reticulate your film by putting it in a very hot water bath to see if the emulsion would start to crinkle.

Volker Schier , Oct 26, 2001; 09:17 a.m.

I just checked. Moersch Photochemie offers an interesting additive for paper developers, which will produce very grainy looking prints from "normal" negatives. They call it Lith E Check their website for it and the availability. http://www.moersch-photochemie.de/html_deutsch/online_workshop/online_ workshop_l3.htm I have not tried the product, but it sounds interesting. There are some dealers in Germany who will ship Moersch products worldwide, one is Fotoimpex in Berlin.

Volker Schier , Oct 26, 2001; 09:19 a.m.

Reticulation unfortunately is no option with most films today. The emulsion is hardened to an extent where it just does not work.

David Parmet , Oct 26, 2001; 09:19 a.m.

TriX at 320 in Rodinal 1:25 for 8 minutes.

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Grain the size of golf balls.

Michael Feldman , Oct 26, 2001; 10:55 a.m.

If David's advice doesn't suffice, then process the Tri-X normally and then wash in 125 F water. Actually you switch to the high temp water at any time after the developer.

WILHELM , Oct 26, 2001; 11:38 a.m.

Put your Tri-X into an oven and heat for 24 hours at 150 degrees F. Cool prior to handling it. Develop normally in D-76 or Rodinal. The older the film the better it works.

JAMES -- , Oct 27, 2001; 06:42 a.m.

any older emulsion film in dektol will give you the large grain you are seeking. I process at 75 degrees F and get enormous grain.

ahmad hosni , Oct 27, 2001; 06:56 a.m.

I think paper grain is indispensible if you want grainy picture. Use lith developer. I wish I can find a formula for a lith developer (or that developer mentioned earlier)!


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