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old panchromatic film developing

Dean Kondziolka , Sep 03, 2002; 10:53 p.m.

Anyone recommend a developing time for old panchromatic film. All it had on it is 620. I have d-76 deveoper

Responses

Chris Eve , Sep 04, 2002; 04:31 a.m.

My "default" for old films like this that turn up in cameras for my collection is 10 minutes in D76. Most older "standard" films had a dev time around this figure. I've never had a complete failure, though the base fog and "print through" from the ink on the backing paper can be excessive if the film has been stored badly.

Chris Waller , Sep 04, 2002; 04:42 a.m.

I once developed a roll of Ilford Selochrome Pan which was about 40 years old. Work on the basis that film wil lose 1/2 stop of speed per 5 years. So if you film is 20 years old assume 2 stops loss and increase dev time accordingly. I work on the basis of 50 percent increase in dev time per stop. Fog levels will be high and you may need to intensify the negs as well.

Pete Andrews , Sep 04, 2002; 06:51 a.m.

Well, 620 is just the size of the film, and nearly all the B&W film made in the past 50 years has been panchromatic. 'Panchromatic' simply means that the film is sensitive to red light, as well as blue and green.<p>You haven't given anyone much information to go on, and films have quite widely varying developing times in D-76. Older, obsolete, films could vary even more than they do today.<p>If the film is really important, then I'd suggest you do a clip-test on it. The first and last inch or so of the film should be blank.<br>If you take a small clip of film from the end of the roll, you can then see, in the light, how long it takes to develop to a good black density, and this gives you at least a starting point for a reasonable developing time. (if you have access to a densitometer, aim for a density of around 2.5 to 3D, after fixing the film.)<p>Better to err on the side of too much development, rather than too little, in any case.

Dean Kondziolka , Sep 05, 2002; 01:19 a.m.

Thanks for all the feedback, I developed at 77 degrees for about 9 minutes and the images are as good as any I have seen!

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