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Development of OLD Agfa Isopan F

Peter Stind Rosendahl , Jun 08, 2005; 09:56 p.m.

I just got an old Voigtlaender Bessa folder from a friend. In it is a very old Agfa Isopan F film - 120 format. I would love to develop this film - hopefully to save some important family photos for my friend, so I need help to identify a development time and developer that will fit this film. What sensitivity did this film have? I normally develop in Perceptol - would another developer be better for this film? If there turns out to be anything on the film, I will post an example here. Thankyou very much for your help.

Responses

Dean Williams , Jun 09, 2005; 12:49 a.m.

The last roll of Isopan F I did (in this century) was developed in D76 for 17 min. Came out pretty well considering it expired in the 60's. It has a speed of DIN 14 if I remember correctly, and I think that's 25 asa. There's going to be some fog, but you can print through it.

Stephen H , Jun 09, 2005; 12:53 a.m.

"The Amateur Photographer's Handbook" gives a developing time of 9 minutes in D76, for what that's worth. 8th Ed., 1973.

The 7th Ed. shows it at ASA 32/24 when developed in "MCM 100", whatever that was. This was considered a "slow speed" film back in 1965.

I found a roll of Isopan F in my dad's camera several years back. I took it to a local prolab. They did a "snip test" and then developed it. The film was damaged some (stored 30 years in a humid climate) but still had pictures on it- including pictures of me when I was about 3 or so. Well worth the effort.

Some other folks have had specific recommendations on how to do this, how to limit fog, etc- try a search if you haven't.

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