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How to store film ?

Jim weinert , Dec 05, 2007; 09:22 a.m.

I was wondering what is the best way to store film ? should it be kept cool inthe fridge or should it go in the freezer ? Also is there a certain time frame before i can load it in my camera ? Thank you for your advice.

Jim

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Robert Vonk , Dec 05, 2007; 09:38 a.m.

Both methods are possible. Put it in a plastic zipper bag to avoid any moisture. From the freezer: It will need several hours to reach the room temperature without too much condensation. From the fridge: 1 hour under normal conditions (50-60% rel. humidity).

Unless it's bulk film. Due to it's mass it will need much more time.

Best regards,

Robert

Bob Tilden , Dec 05, 2007; 09:42 a.m.

I put mine in the freezer. Polaroid film can't be frozen so that goes in the fridge. Freezing protects against chemical degradation. Film will fog over time from cosmic rays and environmental radiation- the higher the ISO speed, the faster it deteriorates. I let 35mm film warm for 20 - 30 minutes before loading- mostly to avoid condensation.

Robert Vonk , Dec 05, 2007; 09:57 a.m.

Correct, 35mm is going quicker than 120 roll film or sheet film.

However it's not impossible to freeze the Polaroid films...... But indeed the fridge is better for those films which are incl. chemicals.

William John Smith , Dec 05, 2007; 10:38 a.m.

Direct from Polaroid: Most importantly, DO NOT FREEZE Polaroid instant film. Freezing can alter the balance of the delicate chemicals and cause processing inconsistencies.

Robert Vonk , Dec 05, 2007; 11:07 a.m.

Correct, but freezing is even better than throw away due to overdue exp. date.

richard prudhomme , Dec 05, 2007; 12:18 p.m.

I put my film in plastic ziplock type bags and keep it the the bottum vegetable drawer of my fridge. Some if my film is expired by a year or so but is still good when developed.

Bruce Cahn , Dec 05, 2007; 01:38 p.m.

B&W is OK at room temperature, unless it is infrared. Color should be refrigerated.

Brooks Gelfand , Dec 05, 2007; 02:57 p.m.

I freeze my film. It should keep longer and there are no liquids in the freezer. Everything is frozen solid. Therefore, there is no chance a food spill will contaminate the film.

According to Kodak, 35mm cassettes and 120 roll films is ready for use in an hour or so. I usually leave mine on the kitchen counter overnight.

Harry Joseph , Dec 05, 2007; 03:40 p.m.

I put mine in the refrigerator because when I want to use it all I have to do is let it defrost over night. Notice i didnt say defreeze overnight. Unless you plan to keep some huge stocks, I would just keep in the refrigerator which is about 32F or less. I have a small 3 1/2 foot high, 4 foot deep refrigerator where I store all my stuff.


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