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old negatives, How to clean

Walter Degroot , Aug 19, 2008; 01:14 p.m.

50-60 years ago. I shot a lot of B&W film that I never printed.

now my wife is scanning all the old negatives. I have a batch of single frame 127 B&W negs. apparently I was careful as none have turned brown. How do I clean these negatives so we can scan them.? I also have long strips of 35mm 30 years old, that need cleaning.

Responses

Henry Posner , Aug 19, 2008; 01:19 p.m.

Walter Degroot , Aug 19, 2008; 03:11 p.m.

thanks for the answer so it cannot be shipped? I am 120 miles away and never get to the "big apple" would like to visit the store , tho,

Frank Schifano , Aug 19, 2008; 03:37 p.m.

Walter, Adorama has a similar, if not identical, lineup of film cleaning solutions. They will ship. Sorry Henry.

Chris Waller , Aug 20, 2008; 04:38 a.m.

I use 70 percent isopropyl alcohol (medical alcohol), available from most pharmacies, and Kleenex tissues.

Bob Sunley , Aug 20, 2008; 08:33 a.m.

Kodak film cleaner from the good old days of 127 film was hexane, a decent substitute is ordinary Ronsonol lighter fluid in the yellow bottles. 98% isopropyl alcohol is a good choice as well, it dries faster than 70%, and it does not contain oils like some brands of 70% rubbing alcohol.

Your choice of solvent mainly depends on what your are trying to remove from the negatives.

Yann Roffiaen , Aug 20, 2008; 10:05 a.m.

I use something called Tetenal, and it also cleans glass plates.

Walter Degroot , Aug 20, 2008; 10:12 p.m.

i asked a friend, former owner of a photo manufacturing company. ( dyna-lite), he passed it off to a pro photographer, who rambled on, and then said he tossed out all his negatives.

I have access to fome fairly pure al;cohol and finally got walmart to sell me lighter fluid ( for old lens diaphragme) thanks all.

Michael Briggs , Aug 20, 2008; 11:15 p.m.

Kodak has a publication with tips on cleaning photographic materials. Their recommendation is isopropyl alcohol of purity 98% or better. See publication CIS-145, "Recommendations for Cleaning Photographic Materials", at http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consumer/products/techInfo/cis145/cis145.shtml

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