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Old Tri-X (Expiration Dates Late 1990's - 2003)

John Romano , Jul 27, 2009; 04:19 p.m.

I've searched Photo.net, and found all sorts of ideas to use benzotriazole, Edwal Liquid Orthazite, etc.

I have a large number of 120 rolls of old Tri-X (the film with lots of silver content), but it needs some help.

In testing for fog, it's coming in with base fog of .52 to .60. Also, using a three minute pre-soak, the film "looks" overexposed. Printing is pretty good, as I am printing through the fog. Shadow detail has been somewhat acceptable, but the film still needs a little help getting rid of some fog, if possible.

Any ideas with tried and proven methods?

Thanks so much.

Responses


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Michael Axel , Jul 27, 2009; 06:03 p.m.

John, are you using an acid stop bath after development? Benzotriazole is a pretty effective method of reducing fog. Also use a developer with Paraminophenol. Rodinal is a pretty good developer for low fog. Also a gram of borax to a liter of Rodinal will work pretty well. You can use household borax, but not Boraxo. Some people use a quarter teaspoon of Ascorbate to a liter of Rodinal, and while it helps with grain, I think borax is a more effective method of adding a buffer to the developer.

John Romano , Jul 27, 2009; 06:29 p.m.

Michael:

I've been using Kodak Indicator Stop Bath.

Should I not?

Thanks.

Larry Dressler , Jul 27, 2009; 07:40 p.m.

I use HC-110 dilution H with old film and the fog is held down.

John Romano , Jul 27, 2009; 07:52 p.m.

Larry:

I used HC-110 Dil B and the above numbers were the results. Maybe it could have been worse?

Thank you.

Larry Dressler , Jul 27, 2009; 08:02 p.m.

Hmmm I wonder how it was stored then? Yess an additive would me needed then. I used to have thes Edwal anti fog pills but I have not seen them in years...

Benzotriazole is what they were they looked like little artificial sweetener tablets.

Sorry I was not of help.

Michael Axel , Jul 28, 2009; 03:12 a.m.

Indicator stop bath is great.

Drew Simons , Jul 28, 2009; 08:59 p.m.

I also have some expired/exposed film that I intend to process soon.

When I was a member of a photo-space, generally I didn't use stop bath because I was using Rodinal to develop both TRI-X and HP5 at a dilution of 1:50. This dilution was as active compared to 1:25. So, instead I was using a plain water stop. Another reason was that I didn't like the odour of it.

So, I was wondering if anyone knows how does using stop bath help reduce the potential effects of fog in the negative? Also, as a general rule is it preferable to use stop bath on older expired film as opposed to fresher film?

Thankyou for any insight into this.

Drew Simons , Jul 28, 2009; 09:00 p.m.

Edit: spelling error above - I meant to write 'wasn't as active compared to 1:25'.

John Romano , Jul 29, 2009; 10:58 p.m.

Thanks for all of the feedback.

Would some Borax or Benzotriazole help with HC-110?


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