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Kodak Contrast Process Ortho Film

Christian Muro , Jul 23, 2011; 07:23 a.m.

I managed to aquire some 4x5 Kodak Contrast Process Ortho Film (Estar Thick Base / 4154 Thick) expired July 1973. I was wondering if anyone had any tips on how to use this film and if I can develop it with D76. Thanks!

Responses

John Shriver , Jul 23, 2011; 10:36 a.m.

It's an inherently very high-contrast film, like High Contrast Copy or Technical Pan. The contrast index in D-11 developer at the recommended time was about 3.4. Kodak only gave times for D-8 and D-11, which are both even hotter and higher-contrast developers than D-19.
While you could certainly find a processing time with D-76, the contrast would still be well beyond the normal pictorial range. You'd really need to use a POTA developer (such as Technidol) to get a gamma under 1.0.
You can certainly do "development by inspection" under a red safelight with D-76, so that you have a bit more control when experimenting. It would probably be more interesting to develop it in D-19, for lith-type high-contrast results.

Robert Meyer , Aug 09, 2011; 08:46 a.m.

I use Diafine for several different types of Kodak scientific glass plates, and for Kodak Electron Image film. It's a 2-bath developer, and you develop all films for the same times, 3 minutes in each bath. I get good approximately-normal contrast negatives out of everything I develop with it.

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