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spot toning

Rick Mah , Jun 23, 1999; 08:28 a.m.

Every time I try to cover up print spots I'm unsatisfied with the result. I suspect that it may have to do with the dye I am using because it seems quite a bit colder than my print. I'm using Spotone #3 by Retouch Methods on the advice of the guy at the photography store. Any suggestions, thoughts, comments? thanks

Responses

Thomas Wollstein , Jun 23, 1999; 09:04 a.m.

With my first attempt, I made a very similar experience. You can solve the problem by mixing two dyes, a neutral black one (the one that you've got) and a dark brown one. To find out the right mixture, use a scrap print on your paper. I found that two parts of the neutral black dye plus one part of the brown dye were exactly what I needed.

Ed Buffaloe , Jun 23, 1999; 10:44 a.m.

Get the Spotone kit with all six colors, then get a little mixing tray that watercolorists use for mixing their paints. Put a few drops of each color in a separate section of the tray, then use the remaining sections for mixing. I let the colors dry, then I wet the brush and pick up the color I need from the dried dyes. By now I have several dried mixtures that match the print color of all my favorite papers.

jim megargee , Jun 23, 1999; 06:31 p.m.

Another suggestion - get three or four 4X5 pieces of glass and use these as your pallets. Mix the color in the center and load up your brush once you achieve the proper color. Then empty the brush along the edge of the glass. This should result in a series of Spot tone "stripes" that go from dark to barley visable. You can then move the glass over the top of the image to determine which density "stripe" to begin with - with some practice. Store the glass in a zip lock bag or glassine sleeve and mark the outside with the paper,developer and toner used for future use.

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