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analite enlarger exposure meter

Frank Lemire , Aug 06, 2004; 02:23 p.m.

Hi Folks,

I did a archive search, but I haven't really turned up what I need to know and the threads are so old the poster's email address bounces ;)

I have recently come into a Analite II exposure meter for use in the darkroom, with no manual of course. I see it plugs into a outlet, and has a spot for measuring light, and a dial to turn and a red light and a white button to push.

My question of course is how to use this new beast. Should I be putting it on a shadow area, getting a setting somehow and then adjusting that setting when i move to a larger print-size, or ?

Any help is appreciated.

-Frank / www.abstrakt.org

Responses

Michael Erlich , Aug 06, 2004; 02:59 p.m.

I used to use an Analite many years ago. IIRC it had two small lamps (one for power on, one for the light adjustment), a small sensor window, and a large dial.

Make a perfect print using your usual technique. Leaving the enlarger settings the same, turn on the Analite and place the sensor on a highlight area you wish to retain some detail in (Zone VIII.) First turn the dial until both lamps are on, then slowly turn it back until one of the lamps goes out. Record your exposure time and note the number on the dial, this number will be used for future prints with this paper and developer combination. To set the enlarger for another negative, place the sensor on another highlight area similar to the one you set the Analite for, with the dial at the previously determined number. Starting with the lens wide open, slowly close the aperture of the lens until the lamp goes out. Expose the paper for the previously determined exposure time, and the highlight on the paper should turn out the same as your reference print. That's it.

I never used it with VC papers, so I don't know what effect VC filtration would have on it. Hope this helps.

DK Thompson , Aug 06, 2004; 03:57 p.m.

Frank, my dad had 2 analites years ago. an early one from the 60s and one of the later 9 volt models. I'm pretty sure I still have the manuals squirreled away somewhere in my darkroom. I used the 9 volt one when I was a kid, and it works pretty good, similar in many ways to an Ilford EM10. You can use it as described above, but you can also use it to extrapolate approx. paper grades by measuring the difference between highlight & shadow density. There are a couple of different metering methods. One is to use the spot method (like described above) or use the little diffusion disc supplied with some of the models, to scatter the light under the lens and read this overall density. Lastly, I seem to remember there were ISO numbers for various types of paper that you could set the calibration dial to.

I'll see if I can find a copy of the manuals for you--if not, I seem to remember making a copy of the newer model for another photonet member, Gene Crumpler, a couple of years ago.

hope this helps.

DK Thompson , Aug 07, 2004; 11:31 a.m.

alright, I found 'em. I got the manual for the analite 400 (the beseler model) and an earlier model--the black one that ran on AC. Let me know if you need a copy, if you live in the US, I'll mail you one.

Frank Lemire , Aug 07, 2004; 06:25 p.m.

Hi,

Thanks for the answers - it's a bit confusing for me since i've never used a meter in my darkroom and always gone with test strips, but I *think* I understand what you're talking about with setting it for a highlight. So, after I get a time for a perfect print, i put in the analite under a highlight with detail, and then with the enlarger on the focus setting, take note of the number after adjusting the knob? not with the timer going on the perfect print time?

Some experimenting will be in order of course. Since I dont have as much time to use in the darkroom as the good ol' days, anything that I can use to speed up my print-to-print time is a bonus.

DK - I'm up in Canada, but would happily paypal you over something to cover your costs, or if it's just a few pages, maybe use a scanner? Drop me a line. It's appreciated.

Cheers.

Tim Flynn , Mar 24, 2009; 10:43 p.m.

If you still have that info, I have the analite Model II that plugs into the wall - would love a set of instructions. Email me direct if you like and I will send you my snail mail address unless you can send them via email. Thanks very much.
Tim

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