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The January Monthly Project Read More

The January Monthly Project

For January's monthly project, Tom Persinger is joining us again to examine how depth of field and experimenting with point of focus can add interest to your photography. Please add your photo to the...

Latest Equipment Articles

Radio City Music Hall with the Samsung NX1 Read More

Radio City Music Hall with the Samsung NX1

This past holiday season, photographer Jackie DiBenedetto got some hands-on time with Samsung's new NX1 Smart Camera at Radio City Music Hall's Christmas Spectacular. Combining high-end technology and...

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A Visit to the Canon Experience Center in Southern California Read More

A Visit to the Canon Experience Center in Southern California

Canon recently opened the doors to its new, state-of-the-art Experience Center in Costa Mesa, CA. The impressive showroom, education facilities, CPS members' lounge, and repair facility astound while...


What is D Max?

Brian Shanley , Mar 03, 2008; 04:58 a.m.

I've been coming across the term D Max alot lately. Is this a purely digital term or does it have any relevance to a darkroom printer like myself?

Responses

Jim Appleyard , Mar 03, 2008; 07:39 a.m.

D-Max is the blackest a piece of photo paper can get; maximum black. Take a small piece of photo paper, expose it to room lights for a few seconds and develop it your print developer for the correct time. That is your d-Max for that kind of paper.

No, it's not digital.

Ellis Vener , Mar 03, 2008; 09:50 a.m.

The term dMax predates the digital era significantly. it refers to the densest value a film is capable of d = density and Max = maximum. For a negative film that will be the most exposed and developed area in the film . It results for m the combination of exposure and development. For a transparency or slide film, the dMAx would be an area of completely unexposed film.

dMin is the reserve - -the most transparent area of the film. it is anotherway of saying "base + fog".

Both values have very significant meaning to careful film based photographers

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