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Creatively Using Selective Focus in Photography and Photoshop Read More

Creatively Using Selective Focus in Photography and Photoshop

Harold Davis, photographer, author, and print master, shares with you how to use selective focus as a creative tool, including in-camera and in Photoshop.

Latest Equipment Articles

From Light to Ink: An Exhibit Using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers Read More

From Light to Ink: An Exhibit Using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers

"From Light to Ink" featured the work of Canon Inspirers and contest winners, all printed using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers. The gallery show revolved around the discussion of printing photographs...

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How to Get the Most Out of a Photography Workshop Read More

How to Get the Most Out of a Photography Workshop

Attending a photography workshop can be a great way to take your images to the next level, but it can also be a big investment in time, money, and travel. By following these 7 simple tips, you can...


What is D Max?

Brian Shanley , Mar 03, 2008; 04:58 a.m.

I've been coming across the term D Max alot lately. Is this a purely digital term or does it have any relevance to a darkroom printer like myself?

Responses

Jim Appleyard , Mar 03, 2008; 07:39 a.m.

D-Max is the blackest a piece of photo paper can get; maximum black. Take a small piece of photo paper, expose it to room lights for a few seconds and develop it your print developer for the correct time. That is your d-Max for that kind of paper.

No, it's not digital.

Ellis Vener , Mar 03, 2008; 09:50 a.m.

The term dMax predates the digital era significantly. it refers to the densest value a film is capable of d = density and Max = maximum. For a negative film that will be the most exposed and developed area in the film . It results for m the combination of exposure and development. For a transparency or slide film, the dMAx would be an area of completely unexposed film.

dMin is the reserve - -the most transparent area of the film. it is anotherway of saying "base + fog".

Both values have very significant meaning to careful film based photographers

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