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Shooting Modes within the DSLR (Video Tutorial) Read More

Shooting Modes within the DSLR (Video Tutorial)

This video tutorial will introduce you to the various shooting modes from basic to advanced. It will explain what each mode does and when is best to use them so you can achieve your desired photo...

Latest Equipment Articles

Tamron's redefined SP lenses - a first Look at the SP 35/1.8 and SP 45/1.8 Read More

Tamron's redefined SP lenses - a first Look at the SP 35/1.8 and SP 45/1.8

Earlier today (09/02/2015) Tamron released details of the first two lenses in their newly redefined "SP" line (see http://www.tamron-usa.com/news/35mm/35_F012_45_F013_2015.php). These lenses are...

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The September Monthly Project Read More

The September Monthly Project

This month's project with guest instructor Jackie DiBenedetto focuses on challenges - and joys! - of photographing kids. Add your best photo to the thread and enjoy the conversation!


What is D Max?

Brian Shanley , Mar 03, 2008; 04:58 a.m.

I've been coming across the term D Max alot lately. Is this a purely digital term or does it have any relevance to a darkroom printer like myself?

Responses

Jim Appleyard , Mar 03, 2008; 07:39 a.m.

D-Max is the blackest a piece of photo paper can get; maximum black. Take a small piece of photo paper, expose it to room lights for a few seconds and develop it your print developer for the correct time. That is your d-Max for that kind of paper.

No, it's not digital.

Ellis Vener , Mar 03, 2008; 09:50 a.m.

The term dMax predates the digital era significantly. it refers to the densest value a film is capable of d = density and Max = maximum. For a negative film that will be the most exposed and developed area in the film . It results for m the combination of exposure and development. For a transparency or slide film, the dMAx would be an area of completely unexposed film.

dMin is the reserve - -the most transparent area of the film. it is anotherway of saying "base + fog".

Both values have very significant meaning to careful film based photographers

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