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Legal waiver for models.

Paul M. Woods , Mar 17, 2004; 07:24 a.m.

Hi - can anyone provide me with an example of some sort of "waiver" to be signed by my (potential) photographic models? Or a few pointers?

I want to advertise for models locally, and would like any successful applicants to sign some very low-key form which means that they would have no rights to the negatives or photos, or to what use I put the photos. I just want this to cover my back, so that 5 years down the line I can't be sued for publishing a photo of someone (who, for instance, suddenly became famous. I doubt this will happen, but hey).

I really don't want this to be a huge document, with lots of legal wording. Just a few lines of text, easy to understand, but legally binding (in the UK), and a signature/date.

Thanks in advance.

Responses

Jim Gifford , Mar 17, 2004; 08:02 a.m.

If you search here for "model release" instead of using the wqord waiver, you'll find lots of helpful comments and info, and perhaps a sample or three.

Jerry Litynski , Mar 17, 2004; 09:39 a.m.

The U.K. has a 'different view' of what a person becomes of legal age.

Most U.S. law has a background or carry-over from British law. They do have lawyers in the U.K., right? If you are worried now about five years down the road -- it would not hurt to consult with a person trained in the law. [In the U.S., a contract requires an exchange of value for the document to be binding: you 'waiver' seems a bit one-sided, with you (the photographer) gaining in the agreement.]

Good luck.

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