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How much to charge for a photoshoot for an advertisement

Laquel Wright , Jul 21, 2010; 07:12 p.m.

Hi all,
It's been a while since I've posted but I have a question about pricing that Im hoping someone can help with.
I am just starting out doing portraits for models and I charge $150 for an hr and a half. I have someone who has asked me to do an hr or so fashion shoot for an advertisement for a perfume. I'm assuming that for something like I would be able to own the pictures but they would be able to use a few of the pics that I give them for commercial purposes and they would include a byline with my name and website to show credit for the pic. Does this sound about right? Would you charge an hourly rate, plus anything else for when it is published (if it even is)? Does anyone mind sharing how they charge for something like this?
I dont think this is a large scale thing because he is looking for a photog last minute and he said his usual photog works on barter (which I am no willing to do).
I know this is pretty basic and legality wise it could be much more complicated but he has just asked me about this today and I would love to get some general ideas on how to handle it.
Thanks so much for your help!

Responses

Matt Laur , Jul 21, 2010; 07:46 p.m.

It would be rather unusual for an advertisement (for a perfume, for example) to display the name and web site of a photographer. The exception might be when the advertiser in question is deliberately leveraging the celebrity of the photographer as part of their campaign.

You need to read up on copyright and licensing/usage so that you have the vocabulary at your disposal when negotiating something like this.

When you shoot, you own the copyrights. That's pretty much the end of that, unless you are essentially on someone's payroll while you do it, or you expressly assign those rights to someone else (generally, just don't do that). When a business is going to use your images, you are granting them a license to do so. You need to put that license, and its limitations/obligations in writing. That license may give them exclusive use of the images, or it may do so with you remaining able to use them for portfolio/promotional use. How much you charge depends, in part, on how valuable it is to you to retain your own use of the images.

Laquel Wright , Jul 21, 2010; 08:08 p.m.

Hi Matt, Thanks for the response. Yes, I'm looking into the language right now as well as the language that I normally use. I do want to be able to use the images for my own portfolio which I usually do so I have that in there. That's a good point about the byline. I'll do some more research and figure out the best language to use in my contract.

Luis G , Jul 21, 2010; 08:27 p.m.

What media will this ad be in? Any idea of distribution? Time it will run?

Kevin Delson , Jul 21, 2010; 09:48 p.m.

I have someone who has asked me to do an hr or so fashion shoot

Commercial shoot? 1 hr allocated? Where did you come up with that figure?
I can't even iron out the details with the art director over the phone in 1 hour. :)

Would you charge an hourly rate, plus anything else for when it is published (if it even is)?

Very little info to go on here.

There are many questions unanswered at this point, but to sum it up:

What is your break even & how much do you need to make?

Laquel Wright , Jul 21, 2010; 10:52 p.m.

Oh I know, trust me. I have very little to go with. I don't think the guy has done this before and he's the one who came up with an hr time frame. Usually even doing a regular model I'm taking pictures for an hr and a half and that's not having to deal with anyone else.
My idea is that basically, Im treating this as a portrait shoot. I've asked him about an mua, and other things but I don't think he has all those aspects together. He said that the pics would be used for posters and flyers promoting this product. I'm ok with that as long as they aren't published in any magazines or papers without my consent.
To answer Kevin's question, I don't have to make a lot on this shoot. I see as being smaller scale which is fine considering this is my first fashion type shoot. As long as my costs are covered, and I have use of the images for my promo use, and he only uses it in posters and flyers, I'm good. I include basic post production work on images but serious work I would charge extra for, which I will spell out in a contract.
So basically, I'm trying to figure out if I should charge anything about my normal rate for images used in small scale posters/flyers.

Kevin Delson , Jul 22, 2010; 07:31 a.m.

As long as my costs are covered,

If that's true, then charge your costs whatever they are.

and I have use of the images for my promo use, and he only uses it in posters and flyers, I'm good.

Include this is your agreement (License) with your client, as well as...

A) A (start date) and (End date) for the image use.
B) The agreement should be for (One Time) (Non-Exclusive) use. If your client objects, try (First Rights)
C) Media type is (Print), specifically "Posters & flyers", in (X) number of copies.
D) Images use is for XYZ company only. No re-sale or re-licensing.
E) Payment upon delivery

There is much more to licensing/agreements/contracts obviously, but these should get you started.

Essentially; you the photographer want to protect your images, limit how they are used and finally..get paid.

YOU grant certain (rights) to the client, YOU (LIMIT USE) of the images, YOU keep (CONTROL) of the images.

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