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Canon EF to Nikon F mount adapter ring ?

Peter Dendrinos , Nov 07, 2006; 11:24 a.m.

Is there an adapter ring out there that allows me to mount Canon EF Mount lenses on a Nikon F mount compatable camera body?

I am not necessarly looking for the electrical connections, just the physical (mechanical) connection.

Specifically i would like to mount my Canon EF Mount lenses on a Fujifilm FinePix S3 Pro UVIR

Thanks for the help Pete

Responses

Mark U , Nov 07, 2006; 11:41 a.m.

I doubt it. The EF mount has a shorter registration distance than the Nikon mount, so the extra distance and the adaptor would both act as extension tubes, resulting in loss of infinity focus. Even if you could find someone willing to make you an adaptor, don't underestimate the difficulties of working with the lenses, since you could only adjust the aperture by mounting them on a Canon body (and that is also true of even "manual" focus for some fly by wire EF lenses), removing them stopped down with DOF button depressed, and giving a resultant extremely dim viewfinder view with which to assess accuracy of focus - perhaps further complicated by the need for an offset at IR wavelengths. You could work the other way round - mounting Nikon lenses on an EOS body via an adaptor. Given the very specialised body you plan to use, it would be much simpler and best to acquire some suitable Nikon mount lenses - there are fine choices available in Nikon mount for most applications.

Bob Atkins , Nov 07, 2006; 02:56 p.m.

The short version of Mark's answer is "No".

It would physically be possible for macro work, but not worth the cost of having a custom adapter made or the effort involved in actually using it.

Peter Dendrinos , Nov 07, 2006; 03:25 p.m.

Thank you Mark and Bob. So it looks like I need to buy some Nikon glass. Problem is I haven?t used Nikon glass in close to 20 years. I haven?t followed it at all. Is there a pro line that is AF, well corrected etc?

Pete

Andy Radin , Nov 07, 2006; 04:36 p.m.

there's a whole Nikon forum, you know. good place for inquiries like this. there is a pro AF line for 1.5 crop sensors: 12-24 f4, 17-55 f2.8, 70-200 2.8, 60mm macro, many versions of 105mm macro, 70-180 macro zoom (unique to Nikon), 85mm 1.4, 105mm and 135mm DC portrait lenses, etc etc. Perhaps not as many choices or features as Canon, but world class glass all the same.

I believe the 105mm f4.5 AIS UV-Nikkor has been reissued, another completely unique lens with transmission range of 220nm-700nm, great match for the S3-UVIR at the low price of only $4000+:

http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=00Eisa&tag=

John Crowe , Nov 07, 2006; 08:20 p.m.

You don't want to mount EF lenses on any other camera since you can't select the aperture. Avoid Nikon "G" AF lenses for the same reason.

Even if you did you'd have manual focus, so you could consider using Nikon manual focus glass like you had 20 years ago. This would save you a lot of money if this is more or less an experiment. Look for the ED designation which is Nikon's "L" glass. Good luck.

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