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IR trigger for wildlife photography

Jerry Bright , May 28, 2007; 03:55 p.m.

I would like to be able to take photographs of wildlife while not attending my camera. I have 10D and 20D bodies.

I see that there are several manufacturers making game activity cameras for hunters. I would like to be able to take photos in the same way with my Canon. I was thinking that perhaps an IR motion sensor connected to a switch that will fire my camera. Has anyone made such a device from a home security sensor or porch light sensor? What is the wiring for my sutter release input plug?

Does anyone know of a device that already does what I need?

Jerry

Responses

Walang Pangalan , May 28, 2007; 04:00 p.m.

http://www.bmumford.com/photo/camctlr.html

http://www.phototrap.com/

and others. It's all insanely priced, only for those who don't know how and can't wait. Otherwise, build your own.

Mark U , May 28, 2007; 04:34 p.m.

You could also use a Zigview R or S2:

http://www.intro2020.co.uk/pages/zigview.htm

Here's one site that covers homebrew solutions:

http://www.hagshouse.com/Hags%20House/Trail%20Camera%20Project.htm

Explanation of the connections can be found here:

http://www.chantalcurrid.com/remoteControl.htm

http://www.diff.net/peter/photography/canon_n3_connector_info.shtml

or hack a wired remote for the plug.

Alistair Windsor , May 29, 2007; 06:45 p.m.

If you are looking to catch very fast critters like bats in flight then you may find the time required to trigger the camera regularly is too long. One solution is to have the camera lift the mirror and open the shutter and then use a beam to fire the flash. This is not really an option for unattended shooting unless you can also dedicate a laptop.

You will of course need a weather proof and secure container for the camera if you intend to leave it unattended.

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