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Best settings for Canon 7D for sports or action

Todd Torfin , Apr 17, 2010; 10:15 a.m.

I was wondering if anyone would share their settings for the Canon 7D for shooting sports action? What do you have all the C.FN's set to?

What should the settings be for Flash on the 7D? I have a 580EXII and at night outdoors if there is dust in the air I see the dust (Looks like snow) how do I get rid of that when shooting? Up my F stop? Tame down the 580EXII?

Responses

Daniel Flather , Apr 17, 2010; 11:14 a.m.

What should the settings be for Flash on the 7D? I have a 580EXII and at night outdoors if there is dust in the air I see the dust (Looks like snow) how do I get rid of that when shooting? Up my F stop? Tame down the 580EXII?

Get the flash off the camera, this will help. Bounce the flash off a wall or bring something to use as a reflector.

Nathan Meador , Apr 17, 2010; 01:29 p.m.

sports action of what sort, using what lens? In most cases, you need as fast a shutter as possible (1/400 or 1/500 or higher) usually requiring ISO over 1600 and lenses at aperture f2.8. If your flash is your primary light source, then that is different altogether.

James (Jim) Johnson , Apr 17, 2010; 02:06 p.m.

"What do you have all the C.FN's set to?"

Why would you want my Custom Function settings? They are called "Custom" so that the User can customize the settings to their individual preferences.

Anthony Murray , Apr 17, 2010; 07:06 p.m.

Hi Todd,
Tough crowd here. I get the best results with the following.
Shoot AI Servo, High speed continuous, manually selected focus point (center) with AF point expansion on. I also use
C.FN IV: Custom controls.
I change the shutter button to "metering start" and the AF-ON button to "Metering and AF start". I also changed the DOF button to alternate between AI servo and One shot AF.
C.FN III: Autofocus/Drive
1. AI Servo tracking sensitivity: I typically leave this at default 0, but with a busy background or with things passing in front of the subject you are tracking, the "slow" setting might work better in some cases.
2. AF priority/Tracking priority
3. Continuous AF track priority
4. Focus search off
12. Orientation linked AF set to "select different AF points"
Rest of settings are default.
Join this group on Flickr.
http://www.flickr.com/groups/canon_7d_digital_slr/

Good luck!

Yakim Peled , Apr 18, 2010; 08:13 a.m.

Why would you want my Custom Function settings? They are called "Custom" so that the User can customize the settings to their individual preferences.



I think the OP wanted a base-point.

Happy shooting,

Yakim.


jason linch , Apr 18, 2010; 08:01 p.m.

thanks Anthony for the tips :)

Dave Holland , Apr 18, 2010; 08:31 p.m.

I don't have a 7d, but I have shot plenty of sports. I certainly agree with the advice to focus with your right thumb (usually CF4 in most models), to give you more control over when the camera focuses, and to dissociate focus from exposure. Your number of incorrectly focused images will go way down. The one other issue that I find important is to shoot with manual exposure. This is particularly important with hockey, where the white ice can confuse automatic exposure meters. I also routinely adjust white balance before the shoot begins, to reduce the effort of postexposure correction in photoshop. Regarding your question about flash, it's a whole more complicated game to try and shoot sports using flash, and you gotta be really close for the flash to have significant effect. If you are just starting out, I suggest you leave it for another year.
Regarding your question about 'dust', I'm not sure what you mean. Do you mean that you are shooting into the sun, and you are getting sunlight bouncing directly into your lens causing lens flare? Remember to shoot with a hood, and avoid shooting directly into the sun. It would take a LOT of dust in the air to get significant atmospheric bounce from a speedlight. Make sure your lens is clean, and avoid underexposure.

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