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Film to Digital Adapter

Andrew Jacobson , Oct 25, 2010; 11:59 p.m.

Hey guys,
So I have an old film SLR camera from the 70's. I love just about everything about this camera except for the high cost of developing film. Yes I can get it on photo CD, but I was wondering of there was some sort of CCD adapter that could turn her into a digital. Any thoughts?

Responses


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Dave S , Oct 26, 2010; 12:34 a.m.

Doesn't exist, unless your film SLR is a late-model Leica R-- which, being from the 70s, it isn't.

Such an accessory back was proposed a few years ago by a company called siliconfilm.com. They had a website for several years, and they raised some capital, but no product ever appeared.

Bob Sunley , Oct 26, 2010; 12:35 a.m.

In a word, no.

John Tran , Oct 26, 2010; 01:01 a.m.

In another word, Yes:). Bring your old film SLR to a closest camera store, it'll take those guys only a few minutes to return back to you a SLR that uses CCD for capturing. The fee is not too much either, usually between $700-$2000

Stephen Penland , Oct 26, 2010; 01:47 a.m.

Although it can go to $6000+, and in a year or so it will be worth half that. You'll spend far less by keeping it as a film SLR. I think the notion that film photography is expensive is an illusion; I've spent far more on digital photography than I ever did on film photography, and I did film photography for decades and digital photography only for several years.

Josh Root , Oct 26, 2010; 01:54 a.m.

I think the notion that film photography is expensive is an illusion; I've spent far more on digital photography than I ever did on film photography,

Of course, every photographer's experience is going to differ in this regard. Case in point, my first DSLR (in 2002) paid for itself with the first year's savings on film and processing.

But again, every photographer is going to a different cost-basis for that sort of thing.

Stuart Moxham - Finland , Oct 26, 2010; 06:49 a.m.

Unfortunately those adapters never appeared. The cheapest option would be one of the older used DSLRs. Another option could be to shoot B&W film develop yourself and scan with a cheap flat bed scanner like a v300 or v500. The scans would be fine for small prints and web uploads.

Sarah Fox , Oct 26, 2010; 10:36 a.m.

... or buy a real film scanner and do all of your own negs. Bulk-load film is quite cheap, even now. Buy a 100' roll of your favorite film, and roll your own. Buy a tank and some chemicals. Basic darkroom equipment can be had practically for free. :-)

Henry Posner , Oct 26, 2010; 11:46 a.m.

Silicon Film. Another bit of vaporware from the WayBack Machine.

Henry Posner
B&H Photo-Video

Walter Degroot , Oct 26, 2010; 12:33 p.m.

Yes technically you could make adapters for old 35mm slr's.
It would be handy and very useful.
possibly would look like a winder " box" attached to a replacement back.
but there is no chance it is going to happen.
economics , business practices.
you could also make a replacement, fuel injected, powerful, engine that would "just bolt in" a 1950 Ford or in a 1963 pontiac star chief. It might meet all emissions and mileage standards. but that is not going to happen eiter
same reasons. ( there is a new aluminum Ford flathead V-8 being made)( car people are different)
a retrofit part for a camera, appliance or automobile rarely happens.
except we do have one, NEWER FILMS that work in old cameras.
It wasn't planned that way, it just was a co-incidence.


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