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Brownie Camera Film

angela severson , Oct 09, 2002; 02:27 p.m.

I would love to find out where I can film for a Brownie Reflex Camera. The manual says I need Kodak Film 127...I will be taking pictures out side. I do not have the flash lamp for the camera. Can I still take pictures inside? If so, what type of film do I need to use. Thank you for your input and suggestions.

Responses

Jason Hudson , Oct 09, 2002; 02:42 p.m.

You can get 127 film in black & white or color slide from www.bhphoto.com

Go to their site and click on "film" and then "127, 620"

I would stick to outdoor photography with the brownie and no flash.

Jason Hudson , Oct 09, 2002; 03:07 p.m.

p.s.

post some images when you get them! I have the lab put my 120, 127, 620, etc. negs onto a CD so I can upload them easily.

Chuck Baker , Oct 10, 2002; 08:36 a.m.

Hi Angela...if you want to shoot indoors or long exposures at night, for instance, your Reflex is one of the Brownies that can be mounted on a tripod. I am an experimenter with exposures so I say go for it! If it's a still life image than a series(or bracketed) exposures might be needed. If it's of a person try having them hold very still while a long exposure is made....you might be surprised by the results! They of course won't be sharp but they may be very interesting. I've hand held with very long exposures and have sometimes been pleased with the dreamlike results. When doing this type of photography it may be better to use B&W film, it's much more forgiving....so use the fastest film you can find, probably 400. If you haven't already, try going to The Brownie Camera Page, there's a list there on where your 127 film is available and go to the gallery to check out some low-light images.

Good Luck and Have Fun with your Brownie,

Chuck

The Brownie Camera Page

www.browniecamera.com

Michael Bean , Aug 08, 2003; 02:28 p.m.

I just recently bought a Brownie Camera (Hawkeye Camera with Flash Outfit) for $10 at a street fair, and I was anxious to test it out. The lens, when held open in bright light looked dusty *inside* and I was concerned. I happened to have a Polaroid camera with me, so one night in a dark room, I set up a halogen lamp (for taking a photo) then I turned off the lights, removed the film pack from the Polaroid camera and removed a single photo. I opened the Brownie camera and placed the photo flat accross the back of the camera and a CD case against that to hold it tight. Then I wrapped a dark towel around the CD case and camera to prevent light-leaks. My girlfriend then turned on the lights and did a quick pose. I clicked the shutter button and she turned off the light. Then I returned the photo to the film pack (took a little more effort than I had expected but it worked) When I reiserted the film pack, that top photo came right out and I turned on the light. It worked! A little dark and very yellow due to the lighting conditions but I knew the lens was fine! If you ever try this, really look at a spent Polaroid film pack in the light and figure out how it works before you try it in the dark, trust me! And be careful not to bend or scratch the photos or you'll get some interesting effects.

Undisplayable photo attachment:
I was too close so the focus is a little off... -- browniepolaroid.jpg)

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