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Petri 2.8 Rangefinder

Dale Weiss , Jul 03, 2010; 12:00 p.m.

I just picked up a mint Petri 2.8 range finder. There aren't many shutter speeds on the lens. Does anyone have one of these and how does it shoot and what shutter speed do you use the most. I am going to use 400 B&W and am figuring 300 for day and work slower the darker it gets. plus I will follow the guide on the top of the camera. Thanks

Responses

Stephen Lewis , Jul 03, 2010; 02:57 p.m.

Here's a link to the instruction manual: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/petri/petri_28/petri_28.htm

Gabor Szabo , Jul 03, 2010; 07:59 p.m.

With only 1/300th as the top speed, I'd consider slower film for outdoor work. Otherwise, you'll be needing a 2x or 4x Neutral Density Filter so you can take advntage of the wider apertures in strong sunlight.

Tony Lockerbie , Jul 04, 2010; 02:01 a.m.

Petri weren't the top of the heap for rangefinders, but still good anyway. The 2.8 lens will give you sharp pictures, but as Gabor has said, just use 100 speed film, otherwise you will run out of shutter speeds.

Frank Schifano , Jul 05, 2010; 12:36 a.m.

You can stop that lens down to f/22 if necessary, and with that you're ok with 400 speed film on all but the brightest days. 1/300 at f/16 will be fast enough for anything except under conditions like a really sunny day at the beach. At f/22 you'll be fine on even the brightest of days at the beach. At worst, you'd only have a stop or less of over exposure which is something most print films can easily handle. In short, don't worry about it. Close enough is good enough. There's plenty over exposure latitude in modern B&W print films. C-41 color films have even more tolerance to over exposure. Transparency films are another story, but I don't think you're using them in this case.

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