A Site for Photographers by Photographers

Featured Equipment Deals

The June Monthly Project Read More

The June Monthly Project

This month we are putting ourselves in front of the lens for a project on the self-portrait with guest instructor Jackie DiBenedetto. Please add your photo to the thread and enjoy the conversation....

Latest Equipment Articles

From Light to Ink: An Exhibit Using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers Read More

From Light to Ink: An Exhibit Using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers

"From Light to Ink" featured the work of Canon Inspirers and contest winners, all printed using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers. The gallery show revolved around the discussion of printing photographs...

Latest Learning Articles

Getting It Right in the Camera: The Imagination Game, Part 3 Read More

Getting It Right in the Camera: The Imagination Game, Part 3

Getting photographs right in the camera is a combination of using your imagination, creativity, art, and technique. In Part 3 of this three part series, we focus on shooting strategy and the role of...


Budget fast shooting dSLR

Simon Bygdell , Oct 13, 2009; 05:31 p.m.

I am looking for a budget, ~$600, dSLR for occasionally shooting birds. Lenses and brand are not very important to me because it will mated to a telescope. What is important - good performance up to, at least, ISO 800 and fast fps. So far, the options available seem to be a used Canon 40D. The soon to be released, Pentax K-x seems ok at 4.7 fps but the buffer is limited to 5 RAW images. Any other options/suggestions that are worth exploring?

Thanks.

Responses

Kari Vierimaa , Oct 14, 2009; 03:24 a.m.

Sony A700, 5fps, 18-25 RAWs.
Nikon D200, 5fps, 22 RAWs.

Both have excellent build. Sony comes with new 920k back display if that matters.

Edit: 40D is cleanest out-of-box at high ISO. Great value at current prices.

Greg Chappell , Oct 14, 2009; 01:30 p.m.

Your budget is a little low to be expecting a framing rate and large RAW buffer equal to or better than that of a 40D in a new camera. Budget and high-speed performance are typically not two things you find in a DSLR. If you want high framing speed and buffer depth in a new DSLR, you'll have to pay for it.

John Vandehei , Oct 16, 2009; 01:17 p.m.

You may want to consider looking at refurbished cameras. $600 will generally get you an entry level DSLR. However, that price may get you the next step up in camera model if you go with a refurbished model.

Back to top

Notify me of Responses