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Budget fast shooting dSLR

Simon Bygdell , Oct 13, 2009; 05:31 p.m.

I am looking for a budget, ~$600, dSLR for occasionally shooting birds. Lenses and brand are not very important to me because it will mated to a telescope. What is important - good performance up to, at least, ISO 800 and fast fps. So far, the options available seem to be a used Canon 40D. The soon to be released, Pentax K-x seems ok at 4.7 fps but the buffer is limited to 5 RAW images. Any other options/suggestions that are worth exploring?

Thanks.

Responses

Kari Vierimaa , Oct 14, 2009; 03:24 a.m.

Sony A700, 5fps, 18-25 RAWs.
Nikon D200, 5fps, 22 RAWs.

Both have excellent build. Sony comes with new 920k back display if that matters.

Edit: 40D is cleanest out-of-box at high ISO. Great value at current prices.

Greg Chappell , Oct 14, 2009; 01:30 p.m.

Your budget is a little low to be expecting a framing rate and large RAW buffer equal to or better than that of a 40D in a new camera. Budget and high-speed performance are typically not two things you find in a DSLR. If you want high framing speed and buffer depth in a new DSLR, you'll have to pay for it.

John Vandehei , Oct 16, 2009; 01:17 p.m.

You may want to consider looking at refurbished cameras. $600 will generally get you an entry level DSLR. However, that price may get you the next step up in camera model if you go with a refurbished model.

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