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Converting color to black and white in batches with PS7....HELP...

Tom Kane , Jul 02, 2005; 09:54 p.m.

Hi-

I have a lot of color images that needed to be converted to black and white. I plan to use PS7. Is there any way to batch convert them all at once or do I have to do each one seperatly? It would save time if I could do it all at once..... Any help please...... THANKS

Responses

Joey Sandoval , Jul 02, 2005; 10:21 p.m.

i'd recommend doing it on an image to image basis
how one image looks may not be what you want for another
just take the time, do it one by one
and you'll pretty much guaranty satisfaction :)

Kirk Thompson , Jul 02, 2005; 10:39 p.m.

Just look in Photoshop Help under Batch. Make copies & convert to Grayscale. Or else change saturation to -100%.

I'd recommend this sort of batch processing, just to see which images might look good in BW. But I'd also follow the previous bit of advice before printing any given image: Try using Channel Mixer instead, & see if you can get results that you like better than what you got in your Batch mode.

(Grayscale is simply a specific channel mix, 30% R, 60% G,& 10% B; other channel mixes are equivanent to using filters with BW film. For example, leaving out the Blue is like adding a light yellow filter.)

Patricia Minicucci , Jul 03, 2005; 02:23 a.m.

Tom: You could write an action that deploys John Caponigro's action (found here http:// www.adobe.com/digitalimag/ps_pro_primers.html) on each of the files. All will be converted, using a separate adjustment set with the lab luminosity channel set to 100% and the RGB luminosity channels set to 0%. The upside of this approach is that you can either accept the lab channel as the the conversion or go back and tweak individual images as needed. The downside is file size, especially if you are working in 16 bit.

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