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How to level tripod legs for panoramas?

regina pagles , Nov 20, 2005; 05:47 p.m.

Can anyone help me understand how to achieve the following? I read this information in Pop Photo/July 2005, but I am unclear as to how to achieve proper leveling of the tripod legs for better panoramas. 'If you have a tripod with a spirt level fixed to the leg platform (not in the head), adjust the leg lengths to get the leg tops completely level. Now level the camera on the horizontal axis only, with a second spirit level mounted in the tripod head or camera hot shoe. Once these steps are completed, you can rotate through the image series with no further need of adjustment.' I do not have a tripod with a spirit level fixed in the leg platform, but want to know if it is possible to manually fix one there. If this is possible, would I fix a spirit level to EACH leg of the tripod? I currently am attempting panoramas with just the tripod head level, and I need to re- adjust the tripod afer each shot to maintain its' levelness. This is very tedious and challenging for me, and I would like some clearer understanding of the above method. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Regina

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Michael Ging , Nov 20, 2005; 07:36 p.m.

I use a circular bubble level.You can buy them at most hardware stores. They have a small circle inside a larger one, and you just put the bubble in the middle of the inner circle.you can lay it on the tripod head, it will set the level in all directions at the same time. .

Rich 815 , Nov 20, 2005; 07:36 p.m.

I use one of these:

http://tinyurl.com/9oz6c

You loosen the lever, level the entire camera, done. Does not matter how the legs are extended or what they sit on.

Chris Leck , Nov 20, 2005; 09:14 p.m.

I use a RRS PCL-1 panning clamp on a ballhead (http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/pano/why_a_panning_clamp.html).

Chris Leck , Nov 20, 2005; 09:15 p.m.

Ilkka , Nov 20, 2005; 10:25 p.m.

What you need to do is to get the tripod, below the head, levelled. That way, when you pan, the platform will be level. Another issue then is to level the camera on the tripod head but that alone is not enough when you pan from left to right.

Many tripods are sold without a head. I have a Gitzo tripod that has a level in the top where the tripod head is fitted. So it is possible to adjust the leg heights to get the bottom of the head straight. If you can remove the tripod head there is usually enough flat piece of metal or plastic to allow the use of a small level. A simple torpedo level would do, but you need to check in two directions, 90 degrees apart. It may take some time to adjust the legs just so that the head is level. Then you can screw on the head and fix the camera and level the camera in your usual way. Other way would be to fit a thin but strong metal plate just under the tripod head and use that for levelling, You could fix a bubble level to that plate. When the plate is level, the tripod itself is level. Instead of adjusting all the legs (or two of them) separately, it is easier to get a leveling head, a small flat head that goes in between the tripod legs and tripod head and allows to finetune the levelling without having to adjust the legs independently. It would be worth buying if you need to do this often.

If you have a pan and tilt head, it is possible to mark the zero positions on the head so that the camera platform is exactly parallel to the base of the head. Then you can use the spirit level on the camera or on the tripod head, just as you mentioned doing, and get the panning platform exactly level.

Chris Leck , Nov 20, 2005; 10:52 p.m.

Another solution is a panning base mounted *above* the ballhead. The ballhead is used to level the panning base. The camera then is mounted to the panning base and can be rotated 360 while remaining level. That is how the RRS PCL-1 panning clamp works.

Edward Ingold , Nov 20, 2005; 11:54 p.m.

If you have a suitable flat spot on the tripod where the legs attach, you can use an inexpensive bubble level from the hardware store, and shorten the one or two high legs to level the tripod. You could also use a torpedo level on the column - it's just more to carry.

A leveling head makes this a lot faster. After roughly leveling the tripod (eyeballing it is often good enough), the leveling head goes +/- 7 degrees or so to finish the job. A leveling head is a ball-and-socket device with a bubble level embeded. Gitzo makes on (G-1321) which fits on Gitzo Studex tripods (13xx, 14xx and 15xx). Bogen/Manfrotto makes on the goes between the platform/column and head on any tripod.

Leveling the tripod makes the pan head turn on a precisely vertical axis, so that the horizon doesn't shift as you pan. You also need to level the tripod head (or camera) so that the horizon is level. A two-axis, shoe-mount level is the easiest to use.

The RRS PCL-1 clamp allows you to use a ball head to precisely level the base of the camera in two axes, and pan using the clamp itself. You might have +/- 45 degrees of motion to play with. The downside is that the horizon is in the center of the frame, which does not make for good composition.

Chris Leck , Nov 21, 2005; 12:29 a.m.

"The downside is that the horizon is in the center of the frame, which does not make for good composition."

Wouldn't his observation be true of all simple leveling (not just the RRS PCL-1)?

One could add a vertical pivot. This could facilitate multi-row panos, 3D VR, or simply allow a pano with the lens axis inclined from horizontal.

Rich 815 , Nov 21, 2005; 01:04 a.m.

"The downside is that the horizon is in the center of the frame, which does not make for good composition." Wouldn't his observation be true of all simple leveling (not just the RRS PCL-1)? One could add a vertical pivot. This could facilitate multi-row panos, 3D VR, or simply allow a pano with the lens axis inclined from horizontal.

Or one can crop.


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