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Best LCD monitor for photography

Will King , Apr 28, 2006; 06:28 a.m.

Did quick search for this but couldn't find any related threads. What is the best monitor out these days fo digital photography? I'm on a PC running XP Pro. The size I am looking into is between 20-24 inches. Are there any sites that rate or review monitors specifically for use of digital photography? Thanks.

Responses


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Steve Swinehart , Apr 28, 2006; 08:34 a.m.

The Eizo ColorEdge Series: CG220, CG210, CE240W, CE210W = $$$$. After that, the Eizo Flexscan series and Apple Cinema displays.

Will King , Apr 28, 2006; 08:52 a.m.

Okay, how about something below $1000. Apple monitors aren't compatable with PC, are they?

Ellis Vener , Apr 28, 2006; 09:02 a.m.

If your PC has a DVI port and you have a decent graphics card, yes Apple monitors are compatible with Windows based PC computers.

Steve Swinehart , Apr 28, 2006; 09:11 a.m.

Yes you can use an Apple Cinema display with a PC. I have never bothered looking at LCD's under $1,000 - so I can't help with that. I use an Eizo Flexscan L997. The same screen as the CG series, but with more defects (I've counted 3 dead pixels - CG series is certified at 0 at delivery); and different control software.

The L997 is specified to have an sRGB colorspace - in fact, it is much larger than that when the monitor profile is viewed in GamutWorks colorspace analysis program. However, you do have to play with the 6 color setup portion of the software to get the screen to 6500K before calibrating. Once you do that, the screen will be extremely accurate (my screen measures 6493K with an X-Rite colorimeter), and the gamut is incredibly large.

Darryl Romm , Apr 28, 2006; 10:14 a.m.

I bought L997 with about 15 hours usage (you can tell hours usage from the software, and I don't think it is re-settable) for about $1000.00 In UK it comes with 4 years warranty, and after giving UK offices the serial number (prior to buying) they were able to tell me when it was manufactured which certainly substantiated the little usuage it had. They also confirmed that they would honour the warranty although it was sold into the German market. It was sold to me with 1 dead pixel, and is quite simply brilliant to my eye. I find the profiling of the monitor nearly a complete waste of time because mine just does not 'wander' over a 3 month period to a level that I can notice. At the time it was more money than I wanted to spend, but now I'm glad I did.

Ira Wunder , Apr 28, 2006; 10:37 a.m.

Just a thought, why don't you consider a CRT like a Mitsubishi Diamond Pro. for about 700 if you have the space on your desk? The most important thing is to have the most resolution as possible. Use this as a starting point to compare other LCD's. If you go to sites like Nextag.com and do a search on 20" LCD monitors they will show you all and where you can order them at the lowest price.

Edward Ingold , Apr 28, 2006; 11:04 a.m.

The most important thing with a monitor is that it can be calibrated and is stable. A suitable calibration system will cost between $250 and $2600. Calibration systems for monitor, scanner and printer start at about $1500.

No monitor has as much resolution as the least DSLR, and you can always use Photoshop to view an image pixel for pixel. An LCD monitor must be used exactly at its native resolution, or you get severe aliasing effects. If the resolution is too high for the screen size, you have trouble reading text in business and system applications. IMO, 1600x1200 in a 20 inch screen is too high, and 1280x1024 is about right.

Godfrey DiGiorgi , Apr 28, 2006; 11:45 a.m.

If you have the appropriate DVI card, the Apple 20" and 23" Cinema Displays are excellent. Very adjustable, very stable and beautiful imaging quality.

I run my 23" at 1920x1200 resolution. It is crisp and clear for everything.

Godfrey

Malahal Naineni , Apr 28, 2006; 11:53 a.m.

Look for dell deals on 2005FPW or 2007FPW. I bought the former for $336. It supposed to be same as 20 inch apple display. No experience with Apple but my Dell looks great, but then I am not pro.


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