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Lightroom's Web Mode allows you to create a gallery that can be directly uploaded to your website. Learn how to use this feature in this video tutorial.

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The October Monthly Project Read More

The October Monthly Project

This month's project with guest instructor Jackie DiBenedetto helps us practice our skills with nature as the backdrop. Add your best photo to the thread and enjoy the conversation!

Glossy or Lustre finish?

Bill Keane , Sep 06, 2007; 04:03 p.m.

I have always ordered Glossy, believing this led to getting the sharpest looking results. Then I saw a post where someone claimed Lustre paper is the best for sharpness (or perceived sharpness)...

So in today's world, when seeking the sharpest looking image on photographic paper, not inkjet, is it Glossy, Lustre, or yet something else?


Dick Hilker , Sep 06, 2007; 04:40 p.m.

The Film & Processing forum would be a better place for this question, Bill, since this is a group of inkjetters who've seen the light and made the switch from the darkroom. Good luck!

Bill Keane , Sep 06, 2007; 04:45 p.m.

My stuff is all digital, but the labs I use print on Fuji or Noritsu machines that aren't inkjet -- and they typically offer glossy or lustre...

Colin Southern , Sep 06, 2007; 05:14 p.m.

Glossy can make things difficult to see due to glare (depending on lighting), and show fingerprints like crazy (the removal of which can often damage the print).

In an album, with a protective film, the film can show bubbles.

I stick with lustre.

Why not try both and compare?


Harry Joseph , Sep 06, 2007; 10:43 p.m.

Bill, I started using Glossy paper with my Epson R2400, because that was the only paper that the local 'Office Depot' sold for my type of printer.

Since then I have switched to Luster paper which is my favorite type of paper and is the Professional Photographers choice. I bought my first 100 sheets at a Professional Camera store about 15 miles from my home.

The travel was well worth it. During my Darkroom days Pearl and Lustre were my favorite B&W papers. I am so glad these papers are available for inkJet printers now, althought they are a little more expensive than glossy. Cheers

Emre Safak , Sep 06, 2007; 10:59 p.m.

The texture of lustre paper obscures minor detail on the print, so you think you are seeing more than you actually are. Glossy papers shows all the warts.

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