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300 dpi vs 72 dpi

Patrice Bennett , Nov 17, 2007; 11:02 p.m.

Okay - here is a quote from someone that is trying to help me fix some images:

" I note, these are exceptionally small files for a digital camera. At this size, we certainly can deal via e-mail for all of them. However, I asked for high-resolution pics because they turn out better because, their larger size provides more detail in them to work on. While these are 300 PPI, which is considered high resolution, they are only about 1.5 inches x 1 inch in print size! This makes for a fairly small pixel size too, making it that much more difficult to get the best results.

That said, I nonetheless can fix these up significantly, just not the bit more I could have done with larger files. Did you do anything to change the dots per inch on them to 300? I guess digital cameras can be set different ways, but typically they make them 72 dpi and HUGE print and pixel dimensions (with those huge dimensions, I can then change the dpi to higher and still have large enough print size). Yours are the opposite.

But this also will mean you need to consider what you will use these pics for. The print size is too small for anything but thumb nail pics. The pixel dimensions are small but still large enough for reasonable use on the Web. Had they been huge pic files, I could have given you pixel dimensions, print size and dpi at whatever you wanted. At any rate, I hope you will be showing these to the company on the computer -- because as they are, they won't work as prints. I note, I can make them large enough for snapshot print size of around 4.5' x 3 ' -- but I would have to reduce the dpi "

----------------------- I guess I don't understand all of this because it seems to me that the 300 dpi should be better than 72 dpi and I always use 300 dpi getting good results at larger print sizes.....

Can someone explain this to me?

Responses


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Ellis Vener , Nov 17, 2007; 11:09 p.m.

All that matters in terms of real resolution is the number of pixels high x number of pixels wide.

If your original photo is 2000 x 3000 pixels it can be output as a 6.667 x 10 inch image at 300dpi or as a 27.778 x 41.667 inch image at 72dpi.

Don E , Nov 17, 2007; 11:12 p.m.

What are the pixel dimensions of the files?

Patrice Bennett , Nov 17, 2007; 11:17 p.m.

The "dimensions" in Adobe Bridge say 3872 X 2592

Patrice Bennett , Nov 17, 2007; 11:24 p.m.

I guess my real questions is - can you change the dpi settings on the camera or are these settings interchangeable once you edit in photoshop? Also, is there a difference in the quality of the image (sharpness) if you can change these settings on the camera? Let's say on a Nikon D80 for instance.

Don E , Nov 17, 2007; 11:29 p.m.

Do the math 3872/300 = 12.9 2592/300 = 8.65

So, at 300 dpi the file will print out 12.9 inches by 8.65 inches, without interpolation.

Don E , Nov 17, 2007; 11:34 p.m.

You don't need to concern yourself about dpi in camera. It is only an instruction to an output device like a printer. You can change it to your heart's content in Photoshop using the Image Size menu item when you want to print.

Ellis Vener , Nov 17, 2007; 11:37 p.m.

3872x2592 @ 300dpi = 12.907 x 8.64 inches

3872x2592 @ 300dpi = 53.778 x 36 inches

Unless you've made some mistake whe nyou resized those files (like not checking the Resample Image box in the Iamge Size window in Photoshop) when changing the resolution) those are numbers you should be seeing.

Yes you can tell the D80 to make various size JPEG images -- read your manual to figure out how to do it-- but doing anything less than full size is generally not a good thing. It's like snipping off your toes to make your adult feet still fit to your favorite pair of shoes from the third grade.

Ellis Vener , Nov 17, 2007; 11:39 p.m.

An obvious correction of my last post

3872x2592 @ 300dpi = 12.907 x 8.64 inches

3872x2592 @ 72dpi = 53.778 x 36 inches

Unless you've made some mistake whe nyou resized those files (like not checking the Resample Image box in the Iamge Size window in Photoshop) when changing the resolution) those are numbers you should be seeing.

Yes you can tell the D80 to make various size JPEG images -- read your manual to figure out how to do it-- but doing anything less than full size is generally not a good thing. It's like snipping off your toes to make your adult feet still fit to your favorite pair of shoes from the third grade.

Don E , Nov 17, 2007; 11:40 p.m.

1.5 by 1 inch at 300 dpi mean your printer is saying the file is 450x300 pixels. Did you mistakenly send thumbnails or images for web display?


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