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Developing agfa scala in regular b&w negative film chemicals

Marie-Claude Simard , Aug 28, 2005; 06:44 p.m.

Anybody ever tried to develop agfa scala b&w slide film in regular b&w negative film chemicals?

Responses

Rich 815 , Aug 28, 2005; 07:06 p.m.

Isn't Scala a slide film? I would imagine you can't. (Well you probably can but might not want what results).

Marie-Claude Simard , Aug 28, 2005; 10:29 p.m.

Hi Richard, thanks for your responding. I was thinking in terms of a B&W crossed-process; I've had very good results in developing color slides in color negative chemicals (C-41)-which is a fairly common practice-, so I was wondering if anybody had experimented with crossed-process techniques with B&W films.

Jordan W. , Aug 28, 2005; 10:53 p.m.

The funky effects that come from processing colour slide film in C-41 chemistry are due to strange dye reactions and cross-overs. But Scala is just a regular B&W film that has been optimized to give good results in B&W reversal processing. My guess is that souping Scala in a regular B&W negative process would give you fairly normal-looking negatives on a clear film base. Nothing too exciting, unfortunately.

Jeffrey Blake Adams , Aug 29, 2005; 12:28 a.m.

search for d-45 on google, he knows more about scala than anyone, and has a process for making negs from it. Jeff

Stefan Voigt , Aug 29, 2005; 03:35 a.m.

Agfa Scala is nothing others than a BW Film with a transparent base and you can develop it in every normal BW developer. I have test it in D-76 but can not remember the process time. The result was thin negatives with much contrast. I think the Scala is too expensive for the results you will get when processed as BW Film.

Jordan W. , Aug 29, 2005; 08:47 a.m.

Jeffrey probably means DR5, not D-45. DR5 is a lab (now in Colorado) with a proprietary reversal process, and he can reversal-process Scala with his own technique.

Stefan's observations are interesting. Thin, contrasty negatives. Sounds like a film optimized for reversal processing (which it is) for projection. Nothing you couldn't do with any other (less expensive) B&W film.

Andrew Kowalczyk , Aug 30, 2005; 02:45 p.m.

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