A Site for Photographers by Photographers

Community > Forums > Film and Processing > Processing - home > Developing agfa scala in...

Featured Equipment Deals

25 Exhilarating Photos of Airplanes Read More

25 Exhilarating Photos of Airplanes

By land and by air, photo.net members have captured stunning shots of airplanes at soaring heights, performing incredible stunts, and in breathtaking locales.

Latest Equipment Articles

4 Outdoor & Adventure Photo Packs Read More

4 Outdoor & Adventure Photo Packs

Photo packs have come a long way in the past decade, especially those that are targeted toward outdoor and adventure photographers. Alaska-based adventure photographer Dan Bailey takes a closer look...

Latest Learning Articles

5 Tips for Combating Red-Eye Read More

5 Tips for Combating Red-Eye

Red-eye doesn't have to ruin your photos. Learn 5 simple tricks to avoid and eliminate this undesirable photographic effect.


Developing agfa scala in regular b&w negative film chemicals

Marie-Claude Simard , Aug 28, 2005; 06:44 p.m.

Anybody ever tried to develop agfa scala b&w slide film in regular b&w negative film chemicals?

Responses

Rich 815 , Aug 28, 2005; 07:06 p.m.

Isn't Scala a slide film? I would imagine you can't. (Well you probably can but might not want what results).

Marie-Claude Simard , Aug 28, 2005; 10:29 p.m.

Hi Richard, thanks for your responding. I was thinking in terms of a B&W crossed-process; I've had very good results in developing color slides in color negative chemicals (C-41)-which is a fairly common practice-, so I was wondering if anybody had experimented with crossed-process techniques with B&W films.

Jordan W. , Aug 28, 2005; 10:53 p.m.

The funky effects that come from processing colour slide film in C-41 chemistry are due to strange dye reactions and cross-overs. But Scala is just a regular B&W film that has been optimized to give good results in B&W reversal processing. My guess is that souping Scala in a regular B&W negative process would give you fairly normal-looking negatives on a clear film base. Nothing too exciting, unfortunately.

Jeffrey Blake Adams , Aug 29, 2005; 12:28 a.m.

search for d-45 on google, he knows more about scala than anyone, and has a process for making negs from it. Jeff

Stefan Voigt , Aug 29, 2005; 03:35 a.m.

Agfa Scala is nothing others than a BW Film with a transparent base and you can develop it in every normal BW developer. I have test it in D-76 but can not remember the process time. The result was thin negatives with much contrast. I think the Scala is too expensive for the results you will get when processed as BW Film.

Jordan W. , Aug 29, 2005; 08:47 a.m.

Jeffrey probably means DR5, not D-45. DR5 is a lab (now in Colorado) with a proprietary reversal process, and he can reversal-process Scala with his own technique.

Stefan's observations are interesting. Thin, contrasty negatives. Sounds like a film optimized for reversal processing (which it is) for projection. Nothing you couldn't do with any other (less expensive) B&W film.

Andrew Kowalczyk , Aug 30, 2005; 02:45 p.m.

Back to top

Notify me of Responses