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Kodak D-60a Developer

lindsey yeo , Jun 24, 2006; 01:12 a.m.

I've checked the archives on this site as well as a google search with no luck. Hopefully someone here can help. A friend who was cleaning out an abandoned apartment came across a box containing about 20 cans of various developers. All but one I've been able to find development time charts for online. It's Kodak D-60a developer for film, the can has mixing instructions, but none for processing. I've experimented with a few of the other found developers (no way to know how old they are) and have had nothing but good results. I'd really like to try this one out as well but I'd rather not ruin film in the process of figuring out the development time. I shoot Hp5+ or Tri-X. Has anyone heard of or used this developer before?

Thanks!

Responses

John Shriver , Jun 24, 2006; 09:18 a.m.

The formula gives a deep tank time of about 9 minutes at 65 degrees F.

It's been aeons since any Kodak film data included DK-60a times. It was a developer aimed at the photofinishing market. There were two replenishers, one for manual, one for machine processing.

Some times from 1945, all in tank, all at 68F. Verichrome, 7 minutes. Plus-X, 7 minutes. Super-XX, 7 minutes. Note that this is from the era when 17 minutes in D-76 was the norm -- this is a highly active developer. I'd start with HC-110 dilution A times, maybe. Or maybe dilution B times?

John Shriver , Jun 25, 2006; 04:42 p.m.

By the way, some folks are into the full cans as collectibles.

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