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Another attempt to create a digital filter to replicate Kodachrome

Ron Andrews , Mar 12, 2010; 06:22 p.m.

Several years ago, I downloaded a trial copy of Alien Skin plugins that purport to create film looks from digital camera images. That evaluation is summarized here. My conclusion at the time was that they were decent attempts, but they didn't match actual film images. Today I saw an article about

Free OneOne plug-ins for Photoshop

I gave the Kodachrome filter a try. In the attached image, the top part was shot with a D200. The middle section applies the OneOne Kodachrome filter to this image. The bottom part was shot on K-64.

I'm not impressed. The greens and browns are darker, the shadows are higher contrast, but it doesn't look like Kodachrome. I'm going to shoot more K-64 this year while I can.

Responses

Eddy d , Mar 12, 2010; 07:05 p.m.

I don't understand why , if one shoots digital, to make it look like film or a certain type of film. If you want the look of film then shoot film. If you shoot digital then it should look like digital, that is why there is a difference between the two, especially the digital shooters who either hate film or no desire to shoot it.

A. T. Burke , Mar 12, 2010; 07:39 p.m.

Mr d....

May I help you understand?

They no longer make Kodachrome.

A. T. Burke

Scott Wilson , Mar 13, 2010; 05:38 a.m.

I quick look at your original shot shows that there is clipping in some of the color channels for some of the squares, this is going to make it hard for the plug-in to work well. The original shot also looks very saturated.

FWIW I would think to do a good job at matching the colors the adjustment would have to be done using the raw file, once the image is converted to either a jpeg or tiff there will be contrast and saturation adjustments made to the image that the plug-in can only guess at.

John Bernard , Mar 13, 2010; 02:45 p.m.

I've got a Kodak Kodachrome Haze filter for Series VI if it would help your experiments.

BTW, Kodachrome is still sold on many websites, and processing is available through this year by Dwayne's provided the K-14 chemicals last that long. It's still here...

Ron Andrews , Mar 13, 2010; 06:17 p.m.

I'm guessing the Kodachrome Haze filter was a UV filter intended for older versions (prior to 1974) that had no UV filtration in in the film. They tended to reproduce open shade rather blue. This picture was shot by my grandfather in 1962.


1962 Kodachrome

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