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The ongoing mystery: how long will 35mm film be available?

S. Usary , Feb 22, 2011; 01:55 p.m.

I realize this question has been asked repeatedly over the last several years, but opinions seem to change by the month and I haven't checked this out in a good while. What are current, informed opinions or facts as to how long 35mm reversal/slide film will be available? I have a mint Nikon F100 as well as a Nikon P7000 as my digital, so I would like for obvious reasons to think that E-6 emulsions will be available for the F100 for years to come. Thanks for any responses, Shane Usary.

Responses


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John Tonai , Feb 22, 2011; 02:03 p.m.

You need to stop worrying about it. Anyone who says that they know is either delusional, lying, or has an overly inflated self of self worth. We can all guess, but that's all it is...a guess. The major companies will deny that they will discontinue a product until the day they announce it, so I just use my film until I can't get it anymore. Once I can't get it anymore, I will adapt.

Michael Axel , Feb 22, 2011; 02:04 p.m.

The date was actually noted many centuries ago, and it is: December 21, 2012.

Erik Prestmo , Feb 22, 2011; 02:05 p.m.

Well since Kodak's venture in China failed, and the chinese bypassed large-scale use of film technology.....
And since Hollywood and Bollywood and Hollyweird as well is moving whole-scale to digital media at this very moment (even full featured movies now shot with Canon Digital SLR's as I understand), the movie undustry demand for kilometres of film have vanished.
This has been a backbone for amateur film for many years and was the sole source for 35mm film at the very beginning.
Now as this market vanishes, we better prepare for film to go the way the dinosaurs went, or pay premium prices for the privilege!
Unbelieveable? Not really I have several friends that worked as radio officers in our merchant navy, and made a good living. Today there are nearly no "sparks" anymore, and everyone and his grandmother expect to use their cellular phone in the middle of the ocean, a phone btw that also doubles as a radio, TV-set, walkman AND a camera!

Luis G , Feb 22, 2011; 02:41 p.m.

On a small scale, B&W film has been, and can again be a cottage industry. As long as there is some demand, I think it will be made somewhere in the world. Color film is something else entirely.

Jim Gardner , Feb 22, 2011; 03:25 p.m.

I used to worry about this but now I just dont for the following reasons, If the many manufacturers of film keep packing in, there will one day be only one or two left. Those one or two companies will have so much work on keeping up with demand making the entire film needs for the whole planet I am fairly sure they would be making nore money than ever they are now.
I understand one can still buy oil paints, parchment, fountain pens and vinyl records. Even now, with the advent of photography, paper, ball point pens and cds.
My mate uses 4 star petrol (very leaded) in one of his bikes, I use monograde non synthetic oil in mine. No problem getting either.

Of course, as we all know, the best way to keep film in production is buy some of it.

Franklin Polk , Feb 22, 2011; 03:35 p.m.

Kodak made glass plates until at least 1999 (B&H listed Tmax 100 4x5 plates), and you can still get them through some European manufacturers. Kodak or Fuji might stop making film (or sell off their film divisions), but I feel comfortable saying that film will be available for the rest of your lifetime at least, through Ilford, Ferrania, Agfa, Maco, etc.

Larry Dressler , Feb 22, 2011; 03:36 p.m.

This is a non thread. Just shoot film and enjoy.

Steve Smith , Feb 22, 2011; 04:40 p.m.

There are no facts, just opinions.

And since Hollywood and Bollywood and Hollyweird as well is moving whole-scale to digital media at this very moment (even full featured movies now shot with Canon Digital SLR's as I understand), the movie undustry demand for kilometres of film have vanished.

I don't think so. A few big name directors have stated that they will not use digital capture and in any case, it's not the initial shooting that uses lots of film, it's the copies made for distribution.
The Red camera is the digital movie camera of choice for some, not a Canon DSLR.

JDM von Weinberg , Feb 22, 2011; 04:45 p.m.

On a small scale, B&W film has been, and can again be a cottage industry. As long as there is some demand, I think it will be made somewhere in the world.

Luis G has it.

Just as already today, former Second World producers, especially, will continue to make film so long as there is even a niche market for it. They can survive without the economies of scale necessary for the larger, still-going producers.


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