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How to clean lenses and filters?

Josh Resch , Sep 08, 2004; 10:19 p.m.

Hi everybody! How can I clean my lenses and filters? There's some dust on it and I can't clean it...any advices??? Thank you...

Responses

Manuel Garcia , Sep 08, 2004; 10:35 p.m.

Lens cleaning: Get a SOFT brush, turn lens upside down and brush away the dust and dirt. Follow up with some hot breath to steam the lens alittle and wipe clean with a micro fiber cloth.

Filter cleaning: Repeat above steps with one exception, sea mist. I just run the filter under tap water first and gently clean with a little soap. Dry with micro fiber cloth.

Micro fiber cloth cleaning: Run under cold water and use hand soap and let dry.

Fazal Majid , Sep 09, 2004; 04:57 a.m.

I use canned air and a camel hair brush to get rid of most of the dust. Then a microfiber cloth with lens cleaning fluid to get rid of most of the gunk that has deposited on the surface of the lens. The last (and hardest) part is to clean with Zeiss disposable wipes (only one pass each, and they are discarded) until the glass is pristine. You can check by shining a very bright light like a Mag-Lite onto the lens. Be careful not to scratch the coatings or leave persistent cleaning marks.

Graham Serretta , Sep 09, 2004; 08:18 a.m.

There's some dust on it and I can't clean it...

How have you tried to clean them? What have you used, that you can't get them clean?

Rob F. , Sep 09, 2004; 09:35 p.m.

When using canned air, do not hold the can too close to the lens, because some residue from the air can is liable to coat the lens. Then the residue has to be cleaned away. And do not tilt the air can downwards, as some liquid might escape from the can. The liquid becomes very cold as it strikes the lens, and could crack it.

When I use canned air to clean a lens, I use a can that has been partially exhausted from less vulnerable items, so that the air stream will not be too strong. That helps to avoid the problems I mentioned.

Dan Flanders , Sep 13, 2004; 12:39 a.m.

I know I am kicking soemeone's sacred cow but in my most arrogant opinion conventional lens tissue is responsible for 99% of the cleaning marks and scratches encountered on lenses. Use only sable or camel hair brushes and microfiber cloth. I also use Lens Pen after assuring that there is no dust or grit left on the lens. I highly recommend a clear or UV filter on the lens at all times unless you prefer to remove it during exposure. At least you have the lens protected and if you forget to remove the filter you will still get a useable foto. By all means store your camera gear as far away from the kitchen as possible, especially if the cook does a lot of frying. Atmospheric grease will deposit on unprotected glass surfaces a long distance away from the source and it is pure hell to remove -- ever try cleaning out a range ventilator?

Melissa Eiselein , Sep 13, 2004; 09:15 a.m.

Harry, I'm with you on the lens cleaning phobia. I keep a UV filter on my lenses, mainly because I'm a klutz and can't my fingers of the glass. I RARELY clean my lens. But when I do, I use the same method as my filters.

I use a soft blow brush, which I've I keep stored in a plastic bag and wipe clean before and after each use. Then I use a microfiber cloth if needed. For really bad stuff on the filter that won't come off with the above treatment, I do use a lens tissue with one drop of cleaning fluid. Then I follow again with a clean corner of the microfiber cloth.

Jim Kerr , Sep 15, 2004; 02:47 a.m.

I've been using Formula MC since '95, there may be something better but I haven't tried it. My method is this: us a blower brush first, get everything off all that will come off. Put 2 or 3 drops of MC on a Q-tip(I use them because pure cotton swabs work best for me),lightly rub the swab over the entire surface of the lens or filter.Using the dry end,lightly go over the lens or filter to dry it.At first it seems like you can't get all the residue to dry, it usually will in a small amount of time,several seconds. A mini-vac works a little faster than a blower brush.

Jim Kerr , Sep 15, 2004; 02:50 a.m.

I've been using Formula MC since '95, there may be something better but I haven't tried it. My method is this: us a blower brush first, get everything off, that will come off. Put 2 or 3 drops of MC on a Q-tip(I use them because pure cotton swabs work best for me),lightly rub the swab over the entire surface of the lens or filter.Using the dry end,lightly go over the lens or filter to dry it.At first it seems like you can't get all the residue to dry, it usually will in a small amount of time,several seconds. A mini-vac works a little faster than a blower brush.

SGT SostanD , Jun 19, 2008; 05:31 p.m.

I have use LENSPEN work will on Hoya Pro1D Filters and dont leave any marks or residue at all but then again i keep a close wacth on my lens

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