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The July Monthly Project Read More

The July Monthly Project

This month's project has us exploring after dark with guest instructor Jackie DiBenedetto. Have fun experimenting with long exposures, add your best photo to the thread, and enjoy the conversation.

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From Light to Ink: An Exhibit Using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers Read More

From Light to Ink: An Exhibit Using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers

"From Light to Ink" featured the work of Canon Inspirers and contest winners, all printed using Canon's imagePROGRAF printers. The gallery show revolved around the discussion of printing photographs...

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How to Get the Most Out of a Photography Workshop Read More

How to Get the Most Out of a Photography Workshop

Attending a photography workshop can be a great way to take your images to the next level, but it can also be a big investment in time, money, and travel. By following these 7 simple tips, you can...


The Revere 8mm Model 88

B B , Mar 01, 2005; 09:11 a.m.

I recently was given a" The Revere 8mm Model 88" 8 mm film movie camera. I accidentaly opened it and found film on it. Is there a way to take the film out safely to have it developed. I expect the film to be very old and probably won't have any images. But i owe it to the person who gave me the camera.

Thanks for your help

Responses

John Lehman , Mar 02, 2005; 11:48 a.m.

You are looking for someone who processes "double 8" film; I don't remember whether the model 88 uses cartridges or reels (I gave my Revere collection away last year). One of the best sources of information is at http://lavender.fortunecity.com/lavender/569/. The maintainer used to have one of the last businesses developing double 8 film, but I believe he closed it a year or two ago. If you can find an old Morse tank at a used camera store, you can do it yourself.

B B , Mar 02, 2005; 05:23 p.m.

Thank you John I'll give it a try.

Russ Rosener , Mar 03, 2005; 03:11 p.m.

Hi, I just bought a Revere 88 at a swap meet last month. Great little movie camera, sort of a Baby Bell & Howell Filmo. The movie film is on a daylight reel, designed for loading in normal light. Most likely it is fine. You'll need to look at the emulsion to see if it's black & white (grey base) or Color (tan base). If it's color most likely it's Kodachrome. Try Rocky Mountain Film Lab. Most likely it's worth getting processed if there are family images on it.

It's 16mm film designed to be processed, slit in half and then spliced together. Fomapan still makes 8mm B&W film. You can buy it at JandC Photo.com. The revere 88 is a wonderful little camera, and true Analog marvel.

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