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Summicron 35mm f/2 Black 8 Elements Or 7?

Jaycee Chan , Feb 05, 2006; 01:35 p.m.

Another Questions Since U Guys Know Everything Please Help me Out Here! Before 1969- 8 Elements Summicron From 1969-1979 6 Elements Summicron From 1979-1996 7 Elements Pre-ASPH Summicron Canada And Germany From 1997-XXXX 7 Elements ASPH Can U Guys Give Me Your Own Thoughts About These Lens Above! I am trying to get one for my M6TTL LHSA and i heard that 7 and 8 elements are the best (For Black and White 100% Better)...but just want to make sure before i spend like couple 100 dollars or maybe more... One last thing dose the new lens Leica makes now days any good compare with the old ones? Because i heard the new one supposed to be better(On Colors at least and weaker in B&W)....well that is what they said...maybe they just want people to buy them...


This Is a Summicron 35mm f/2 Black 8 Elements

Responses


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Al Kaplan - Miami, FL , Feb 05, 2006; 01:59 p.m.

I sold my Wetzlar made black paint 8 element Summicron and kept the 6 element that I also owned. For a number of years I'd find myself in situations where I'd be shooting B&W a color at the same time so having duplicate equipment made sense. When it came time to pick which to keep? My choice was the obscene amount of money I was always being offered for that black paint eight element. I kept the six element.

Ronald Moravec , Feb 05, 2006; 02:04 p.m.

The lenses from the early era lacked microcontrast and the image has sort of a soft/sharp quality.

Lots of people like the image as opposed to today`s bitting high contrast image.

The lens shown is an early one, probably version 1 or 2. I am not versed enough to tell them apart with just a side view. I think it is a black version 1 and worth lots of money. Hope an expert chimes in. You may have to put up more views. One showing detail of the focus tab will help.

David L , Feb 05, 2006; 02:34 p.m.

I have two 35mm Summicrons, a 6 element version 2, and a new ASPH. I love them both. The v. 2 produces great b&w negatives and the ASPH produces outstanding slides with glorious colors. I don't know why most people ignore the v. 2 (and v. 3) lenses. Mine seems to have no vices and I got it for a song. I like to think of it as the "Rodney Dangerfield of Bokeh" since it's so often ignored, despite being such a fine performer.

Rob F. , Feb 05, 2006; 02:35 p.m.

The lens pictures is a version I.

The reduction from 8 elements to 6 (versions II and III) brought an increase in contrast, although they are not quite as sharp as the earlier version. Nevertheless all 35mm Summicrons--and the 35mm Summaron--are plenty sharp enough for most work. When better coating became available, Leitz went from 6 to 7 elements (version IV), for improved correction, with no loss in contrast, due to the improved coating. There is no loss in sharpness with the version IV either, compared to the 8-element version I, owning to the use of newer optical glasses. The build quality of version I is the best.

The version I is preferred by some for black and white, owing to its lower contrast. I wouldn't take this too seriously, as you can accomplish the same thing by knocking a minute off the developing time.

You can get the aspherical Summicron for less than the price of the version I. If you need the best wide-open performance, that's the way to go. You are looking at over $1000 for a version I or an ASPH. Version II or III, probably $700.00. Version IV, $900-1000. You are not going to get any 35mm Leica lens for a couple of hundred dollars, unless it fell onto concrete from a third-story balcony.

Eliot Rosen , Feb 05, 2006; 03:02 p.m.

It is a first version black finish 35/2 Summicron. A lens highly desired by collectors. You will not be able to buy that lens for several hundred dollars. I'm afraid the bidding starts at $ 2000 and may end much higher than that for one in nice condition.

Tony Senzaorbi , Feb 05, 2006; 04:02 p.m.

I'm glad I'm not the only one who was skeptical that lens could be had for a "couple hundred". In fact, is there any 35 Summicron that goes for less than $7-800 these days, unless the glass is fungussy or scratched up?

Robert Haller , Feb 05, 2006; 05:58 p.m.

... great lens...! Seems to be a plack-paint one.... where can I buy it....?

Raymond Tai , Feb 06, 2006; 03:17 a.m.

They are all good but which is right for you depends on your personal taste. You'll just have to try them all and see for yourself. The 8 elements is lower in contrast, the 6 element higher in contrast, the second version 6 element still higher, the 7 element very high and the asph razor's edge high. Color fidelity also went from warmer to cooler. I personally like the 7 element.

Jaycee Chan , Feb 06, 2006; 06:20 a.m.

Thx Very Much! For All The Infos and More Info is always welcome!


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