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Polarizing filter for snow

Lawrence Sampson , Dec 01, 1998; 12:20 a.m.

Can a polarizing filter be useful for shooting snow scenes? If so, what's the advice in using it? I'll be going to Antartica in January and am trying to prepare as best as possible for what may be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity!

Responses

Bob Atkins , Dec 01, 1998; 12:50 a.m.

Depends what you expect it to do. It could take some of the "glare" off ice I guess. On white, powdery, fluffy snow, I wouldn't expect it do do much, if anything. Certainly take one though. Traditional uses (darkening blue skies etc.) still apply.

Y. Dobon , Dec 01, 1998; 01:10 a.m.

At least in sunny conditions, I think a graduated ND filter might be more useful than a polarizer (especially with slide film). Take 0.6 and 0.9 ND grad filters along with your polarizer; I admit I'm not familiar with Antartica weather conditions in January (it's summer, right?) although I've been to Australia/NZ.

M. Huber , Dec 01, 1998; 07:56 p.m.

That's an interesting question, simply because i don't remember trying a polarizing filter on snow. Try it at home before you go and see if you like any of the effects you see. I would go for a ND also, as well as some warming filters. I say some because it's too far to go to wish you had something else.

BRAD CARLSON , Dec 04, 1998; 09:43 a.m.

i assume you will be shooting many more subjects than just "snow" so though your question doesn't directly ask it, i would suggest you look at threads that explain the advantages/uses of polarizers in various conditions. after all, you will probably be near a lot of water, outstanding colors, animals, and so on. you will definitely find a use for a polarizer and since it is a once in a lifetime opportunity you should not leave it at home.

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