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Singh-Ray VariND filters - do they polarize?

Kuryan Thomas , Feb 21, 2009; 11:04 p.m.

Anyone know if Singh-Ray VariND filters also act as polarizing filters?

I often use polarizers on water landscapes to cut down on reflection. If the VariND also polarizers, I can avoid stacking.

Thank you.

Responses


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Kuryan Thomas , Feb 21, 2009; 11:13 p.m.

Just found the Vari-N-Duo filter, which combines VariND and a polarizer.

David Henderson , Feb 22, 2009; 06:28 a.m.

Yes and its $390 as a so called introductory price. Looking at this filter I would doubt whether it avoids the consequences of stacking. It looks as thick as two regular filters and I suspect that it is in fact two glass filters in a tailor made ring, and that you are in effect stacking two filters. I would expect this to vignette at least at the wide end of my zooms, though I use a full frame camera. The benefit seems to me only that you save a second screwing on another filter, and to me that is not a good trade off against the fact that you're forced to have the polariser permanently attached whether you want it or not.

Kuryan Thomas , Feb 22, 2009; 10:42 a.m.

Good points, David. I was thinking of getting one, but I think I'll just stick with the VariND and attach a polarizer if I think I need one. Thank you.

Edit: Visited your website, David - great images. I enjoyed myself.

Mary Doo , Feb 22, 2009; 09:49 p.m.

<< you're forced to have the polariser permanently attached whether you want it or not. >>
True, but I think you probably won't mind the polarizer when your intent is to dim the light. Otherwise, why bother with this filter? However, the benefit of a variable ND is not a necessity, as one achieves equivalent results by using regular ND filters.

Re vignette: It does below 17mm on the 12-24mm lens looking thru a Nikon D200 camera.

Kuryan Thomas , Feb 24, 2009; 08:15 p.m.

Re vignette: It does below 17mm on the 12-24mm lens looking thru a Nikon D200 camera

Do you mean the regular VariND or the Vari-N-Duo? Thanks.

Mary Doo , Feb 25, 2009; 12:39 a.m.

Kuryan, I happened to test the vignette using the new Vari-N-Duo. The older VariND has the same thickness. So it should vignette similarly.

By the way, you mentioned in a prior post that you would "stick with the VariND and attach a polarizer if I think I need one". Hwvr, the polarizer is already part of the setup. According to Singh-Ray, the two pieces would not come apart. (Oddly though, mine did, and they were surprised.)

Kuryan Thomas , Feb 25, 2009; 07:37 a.m.

Mary, the polarizer is part of the Vari-N-Duo setup, right? Not the VariND? Or do I misunderstand? If I bought the VariND, I could attach or detach my own polarizer, is that right?

Thanks for your responses.

Mary Doo , Feb 25, 2009; 01:44 p.m.

Hi Kuryan, as mentioned above, the polarizer is already part of the filter. Both Vari-N-Duo and VariND are constructed similarly. Yes, you can attach an additional polarizer on top, but I am not sure why this would be necessary, as you can dial in 2-8 light stops.

Kuryan, another good option to slow down the shutter speed is a regular ND of 4 or 8 stops made by B+W.

Good luck,
Mary

Kuryan Thomas , Feb 25, 2009; 03:08 p.m.

OK, just to clarify: I contacted Singh Ray and there are 3 choices:

VariND thin: variable neutral density, no polarizer, no additional filter threads (you cannot attach your own polarizer).

VariND regular: variable neutral density, no polarizer, with additional filter threads (you can attach your own polarizer).

Vari-N-Duo: variable neutral density, WITH "warming" circular polarizer, with additional filter threads. No need to attach your own polarizer. A Cokin P-style holder CAN be attached if you want to use a grad ND in addition to the variable ND plus polarizer (wow - that's a lot of filters!).

The Vari-N-Duo is slightly thinner than the VariND regular plus a thin Nikon polarizer, by about 1-2mm.


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