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D100 Slide copy adapter?

Thomas Hudson , Jan 27, 2005; 01:20 p.m.

I have a D100 and a bunch of old 35mm slides I want to digitize. I found an inexpensive slide duplicater from Bower ("Digital Duplicator") which is a piece of crap. The optics are terrible and you cannot get a decent focus to save your life.

Can anyone tell me if there is a good quality attachment for the D100 that will allow quality slide duplication? There has to be something out there. Thanks!

Responses

Jeffrey Moore , Jan 27, 2005; 01:29 p.m.

Why don't you just scan them? Even a mediocre used film scanner (which can be found quite cheap) will do a better job of digitizing your slides than a D100 and a slide duplicator.

Doug Andrews , Jan 27, 2005; 02:29 p.m.

"Even a mediocre used film scanner (which can be found quite cheap) will do a better job of digitizing your slides than a D100 and a slide duplicator."

I'll second that. I have the Nikon slide copy adaptor for my CoolPix 4500. At first I was pleased with the results most of the time, but eventually decided to just drop some $$$ and do it right. I purchase a dedicated film scanner (Minolta Scan Dual IV) and I have not and will not use a slide copy adaptor/duplicator ever again.

Wilfred Wong , Jan 27, 2005; 08:05 p.m.

I 've a canon 4000 dpi film scanner yet i think doing slide copy /w DSLR is fine, at least with small prints. havn't tried 8x 12 /w them.

why DSLR instead of film scanner? speed (and lazyness) and if you 've a macro lens already, you don't 've to spend much.

you need a good macro lens like 60mm micro. and slide dup adaptor, and i used a pair or reserve mount to exten the tube as the slide dup adaptor is designed for film but not DSLR.

of course, using film scan give more detail.

Marco P , Jan 28, 2005; 07:30 a.m.

"Even a mediocre used film scanner (which can be found quite cheap) will do a better job of digitizing your slides than a D100 and a slide duplicator." I could not scan this good with a canonscan 2700f film scanner (an early 2700 dpi model). The scanner may have more detail, but also lots of noise in the dark parts of the image. This is from a D70, 55 micro Ais, slide on a light table. There was a slide copy adapter for this 55 mm lens, but due to the smaller sensor size I think you could not capture the whole slide - 1:1 on a DSRL is smaller than 24x36 mm. If you find out a slide duplicator my advice is to try it before you spend money on it. Marco


D70 as a film scanner

Thomas Hudson , Jan 28, 2005; 12:19 p.m.

Thanks for the responses, everyone. I'm taking a look at some of the scanners you mentioned; The Scan Dual IV's price is certainly right and it looks like it'll do what I want -- I was shooting for around 3000DPI, and the reviews I've found for it are pretty positive.

I appreciate the input!

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