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polarizing filter- which to buy?

Jessie Moore , Jul 23, 2007; 04:55 p.m.

I am about to buy a polarizing lens for my 18-135 lens.. Which size would I get and what brands does anyone recommend? I do a lot of interiors and product photography. Thanks

Responses

Jessie Moore , Jul 23, 2007; 04:58 p.m.

speedlight

Also what are the differences in Speed lights. I have begun to second shoot for weddings and need my own speedlight. I have looked at SB-28 AF Speedlight Dedicated and SB-80DX Speedlight TTl Shoe Mount Flash and the SB-50 DX Speedlight TTL Shoe mount flash. What are the differences for the price?? thanks so much

Shun Cheung , Jul 23, 2007; 05:09 p.m.

Whether you can use the older SB-nnDX speed lights or not highly depends on which camera bodies you use; those are only for the D1 family and D100 bodies. For future compatibility and weddings, I would get SB-800 flashes, even though you may be using an older DSLR body.

I would get a 67mm polarizer to fit your 18-135mm lens. However, if you are shooting professionally, IMO it is a matter of time that you'll need to upgrade your lens.

Jerry Litynski , Jul 23, 2007; 05:52 p.m.

When you look for a filter, you will need to check that the 'circular' polarizer is the one you are looking at buying. The older, non-circular polarizer filters will not autofocus properly on a digital Nikon body.

Ronald Moravec , Jul 23, 2007; 06:54 p.m.

Linears expose and autofocus fine on my D200 reguardless or filter rotation. I had one old one and bought a new for 18/70 . It is a recent filter in the clear/grey slide out box. $40. Spend 150 on a circ if you want.

I must warn you Tiffin linears are greenish like very old Leica ones.

B+W are not. Look thru then at white paper and you can see the difference. It is obvious.

I made and saved a curves correction to rebalance the green. I reload and apply for every shot with any of my 3 Tiffnin`s. I do not have to do this with B+W or Leica. I would not use one for film for this reason. Digi is fixed with a few clicks so it matters not. I am talking about 10 cc green and 10 blue in the highlights only. You could never balance this with a chemical print.

Jessie Moore , Jul 23, 2007; 07:27 p.m.

ah.. thanks guys. as far as the lens upgrade, do you mean going to a fixed lens? or in what circumstances is the 18-135 not a good choice? besides when you need a more wide or longer lens?

Daan Barnhoorn , Jul 24, 2007; 05:06 a.m.

Maybe I am missing something here, but why do you want a polarizer for interior and product photography?

Jeffrey Engel , Jul 24, 2007; 07:04 p.m.

18-135mm is probably fine for interior and product photography if you know how to fix the distortion. I mean, nobody shoots interiors at f2.8 so it doesn't matter that it's a slow "non-pro" lens. What matters is sharpness and distortion. Distortion you can fix in Photoshop.

That said, you should get a B+W or Schneider (both are same company) Polarizer. They are excellent quality and probably cost the most. I paid close to $150 for mine, 77mm thread. I can also tell you that it doesn't lose as much light as a Hoya or Tiffen.. I did some rough tests.

Daan Barnhoorn asked why you would need a Polarizer for interiors or products. Because Polarizers affect glare and reflections. If you don't want glare or reflections in an interior space, or on a shiny product, then you could use a Polarizer, simple as that. I've done it before, especially with laminated and laquered wood, glass, etc, I can "dial" down the amount of glare as I see fit. I love it.

If you are doing interiors professionally, I definitely would look into prime lenses, and/or the 12-24 Nikkor or Tokina. These two lenses still have distortion, but they can be corrected in Photoshop.

Don't forget to look at the primes. Go to Kenrockwell.com if you don't know what's out there. Look for the huge list of Nikon lens reviews, it's got tons of them, and start looking at all the prime lenses that are below 28mm. The smaller the focal length, the wider of course. Then as you get around 14mm, you get overlap between super wide and fisheye.

Daan Barnhoorn , Jul 25, 2007; 02:14 a.m.

"Daan Barnhoorn asked why you would need a Polarizer for interiors or products. Because Polarizers affect glare and reflections. If you don't want glare or reflections in an interior space, or on a shiny product, then you could use a Polarizer, simple as that. I've done it before, especially with laminated and laquered wood, glass, etc, I can "dial" down the amount of glare as I see fit. I love it."

Aha, thanks for clearing that up... Still one question: since the polarizer has the most affect when on 90 degrees to a light source, how are you dealing with that in case of interior photography?

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