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Best lens with a Nikon D40X

Neha Gandhi , Oct 08, 2007; 03:31 p.m.

Hello,

I am planning to buy a Nikon D40X and have no clue about cameras and lenses at all. I narrowed down my choice of lenses to

-> 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor -> 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S DX Nikkor -> 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DG Macro Compact Hyper Zoom Aspherical for Nikon AF-D -> 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5G ED-IF AF-S DX Nikkor + 70-300mm f/4-5.6G ED-IF AF-S DX Nikkor Please tell me which one would be the best one.

I am really looking forward to your opinions...as it reallsy helps me to make a decision.

Responses

Ronald Moravec , Oct 08, 2007; 03:40 p.m.

If you intend to go between tele and wide angle a lot and don`t want to change lenses. 18/135 or 18/200. If most of your pics are normal, the 18/70 is ok and add the 55/200 VR or 70/300 VR for ocassional tele work.

Hold a six in ruler at arms length to see about what 70mm will cover. If you need less, you need a longer lens.

The 18/135 and 55/200 have plastic lens mounts that are more fragile than metal mounts if they take a hit.

Without knowing the subjects, it is hard to make specific recomendations

Neha Gandhi , Oct 08, 2007; 04:01 p.m.

Ronald...

thanks for your suggestion... I wouldnt have a specific subject...its just gonna be basic stuff... capturing moments... no sports.... no nature... no fashion photography , to be specific...

So...for basic stuff... which one would you suggest?

Errol Young - Toronto, ON, CA , Oct 08, 2007; 04:23 p.m.

The 18-70 is one of the best for the money. I use it 90% of the time.

I use it for portrait, action etc.

Most of the stuff that you see on my site youngphoto.ca is done with it but not first one that you see.

Errol

Elliot Bernstein , Oct 08, 2007; 04:59 p.m.

If you get the 18-135 and the SB-400 flash and you will be a happy camper ready to take on most settings you would want to photograph.

Peter Hamm , Oct 08, 2007; 05:07 p.m.

I'd get the 18-70 and an SB600, then get something longer later if you decide you need it.

I have the 18-200, however, and am TOTALLY glad that I bought it instead of the 18-70, even though it's two-and-a-half-times the price. GREAT lens, but a lot of money, and today I might buy the 18-70/70-300 combo you mention. But I'd get a speedlight before I got the long lens. The built-in flash ain't enough.

Ronald Moravec , Oct 08, 2007; 07:32 p.m.

18/70 was my first and is my most used lens. Unless you specialize in sports, wildlife, or closeup macro work, it will do 90+ per cent of what you want.

Richard Borovoy , Oct 09, 2007; 08:42 a.m.

I chose the 18-70 over the 18-135 when I bought my D80 and have no regrets. I also compared the results to a friends 18-200 and the 18-70 came out on top.

While it obviously is limited to 70mm on the long end, the lens is very usable over its entire range which is more than can be said for a lot of zooms.

I also wanted something longer and decided to try the 55-200VR with every intention of returning it if didn't perform. Dollar for dollar, I can't think of a better lens in this range. Yeah, the plastic mount is a drag and you have to wonder how much a metal mount would have added to the cost. In any case, I change lenses often and so far find no wear issues.

My advice would be to start with the 18-70 and base the choice of a second lens (if needed) on whether you find yourself running out of range on the long or short end.

Eric Arnold , Oct 09, 2007; 11:23 p.m.

i have the 18-70 and it's a solid, if unsexy, choice. but if i were you, i'd get the 18-135 for general photography because it gives you a bit more reach for portraiture; on a dslr, 70-100 is a pretty useful portrait range, and you might miss that with a smaller lens, especially if you're coming from a P&S. plan on expanding down the line as specific lens interests become more clear; keep in mind you will not be able to AF with some lenses.

Kiran Chakravadhanula , Oct 10, 2007; 06:53 a.m.

Instead of the 18-70 and 70-300 combo you could stretch your budget a bit and go for the 18-200. That lens has some great reviews and its a do-it-all lens. You will enjoy taking pictures much more if you just had one lens that could take all kinds of pictures that you wanted it to.

Kiran

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