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How do you clean a "coated" Nikon lens filter? Nothing works for me...

Dave Weber , Jun 16, 2008; 02:58 p.m.

I have a 52mm screw on Nikon L1Bc filter. I believe that the "c" stands for coated. I've tried 4 or 5 diffenent methods of cleaning this filter, and so far, everything has left streaks (or smudges) on the filter. Have any of you found a good way to clean a "coated" lens filter?

Responses


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Arthur Yeo , Jun 16, 2008; 03:10 p.m.

Get a bottle of Zeiss lens cleaner fluid.

Alan Peed , Jun 16, 2008; 03:26 p.m.

Hello Dave. When i acquire a used camera from a thrift store, the lens is usually pretty dirty, but not scratched. Here's how i clean up my coated lenses and filters.

1. Visually inspect the lens surface under a good light.

2. Use the Hurricane rubber bulb to blow moderate puffs of air onto the lens, with the objective of removing any loose clinging dust, hairs, powders, grit, or the like.

3. Follow that with a very careful and gentle brushing over, using the soft-hair brush to try and 'sweep' off any dust or dirt that was resistant to blowing. When i use the brush, i try to cover the whole surface, but carefully, gently, and deliberately. And not in a way that would scratch the lens.

4. I follow that with a circular pattern of wiping using "Zeiss Lens Cloths".These are pre-moistened, lint-free, small-fiber disposable napkins. They sell them at Walmart, 50 per box, and a box costs about $3. They are pre-dampened with (i think) isopropyl alcohol. Its damp enough to do a good job cleaning the lens, but not so wet that its soaked or dripping. I give the lens a good wiping over with one of these, again, using gentle pressure, but a careful and deliberate technique.

In order to minimize the chance of leaving a smudge, wipe the filter in a circular pattern, and on the last 'swipe', just lift the napkin off the surface in a smooth "lifting away", sort of like a duck taking off from a lake. Hard to explain.

This same technique will also clean Lens Fungus off old lenses, but in that case, you want to use about 2 or 3 times as much 'pressure' when you wipe with the Zeiss Lens Cloths.

I hope this helps.

Geoff Sobering , Jun 16, 2008; 03:51 p.m.

I happen to have PEC-Pads and Eclipse solution around for occasional "wet method" sensor cleaning. Those two products were originally developed for cleaning high-end optics, so that's what I use...

http://photographicsolutions.com/eclipseproduct.htm

Ronald Moravec , Jun 16, 2008; 04:15 p.m.

If they are like the original coated B+W, you need a solution that leaves no residue and a very clean cloth with no soap or detergent left in it. Pure water or alcohol is fine, but tough to get. Not the denatured stuff from the drug store. Distilled water is not pure either. You need reagent grade.

I heve good luck with the Zeiss lens cleaner and the Eclipse for cleaning sensors should be even better.

Craig Shearman , Jun 16, 2008; 04:28 p.m.

After years of cleaning lenses with lens tissue, lens cleaner, etc. I generally just use a clean 100 percent cotten soft white T-shirt. Breathe gently on the lens or filter before rubbing, and rub gently. This is after blowing off any dust.

Frank Skomial , Jun 16, 2008; 04:37 p.m.

The filter must be very dirty then.

Usually the wet end of the Nikon original lens pen does good job on removing minor oily fingerprints.

The Nikon lens pen moisture goes out pretty fast from it, if not capped properly. When is dry, is of no help. New fresh Nikon lens pen lasts for me about 1 year, and is handy in the field.

Dave Weber , Jun 16, 2008; 06:59 p.m.

Thanks everyone, I greatly appreciate your responses! I'm going to try cleaning the filter again. Dave

Dave Weber , Jun 16, 2008; 07:10 p.m.

Thanks everybody, I appreciate your help. Dave

Kevin Foster , Jun 16, 2008; 10:05 p.m.

Dave,

I use Zeiss lens cloths. They are packaged like handi-wipes, and have just enough lens cleaner on them so they dont streak. They work great for me. The best thing is their sold at walmart in the optical section.

Kevin


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