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Compare dynamic randge: D700 Vs. D200

Sam Ginger , Jul 02, 2008; 12:22 p.m.

Please, explain dynamic randge, and compare it D700 Vs. D200. Thanks, Sam

Responses


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Donald Weston , Jul 02, 2008; 12:36 p.m.

Simple answer is no one knows at present. Ask again in about 4 weeks, assuming camera is released when we all think it is, end of July. I would GUESS that being a FF chip, it would have better dynamic range, but until it is in actual use, the amount it is better is anyone's guess....

Elliot Bernstein , Jul 02, 2008; 12:44 p.m.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_dynamic_range_imaging

More is better.

Todd Wilson , Jul 02, 2008; 01:02 p.m.

Here is the info for the DR of the D200:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/NikonD200/page22.asp

Haven't seen it for the D700 yet, understandably.

Ellis Vener , Jul 02, 2008; 01:09 p.m.

If , as appears to be the case, the D700 is using the same internal image pipeline as the D3, in 14 bit per channel NEF mode you'll have about 12 stops of real dynamic range with the D700.

My best guess withthe D200 is that the dynamic range is closer to aboput 10 stops.

Dynamoic range is the measure of the sensor (or film + developer's, or paper's) ability to record tones from absolute black to absolute white . Actually absolute black and absolute white are easy so what we really mean by dynamic range is how much real world detail can be seen in the areas just above absolute black and just below absolute white. The larger the dynamic range the greater the ability to see those differences ("Difference is detail" --Bruce Fraser). Mostly where we we see the benefits of large dynamic range is up in the ability to record detail up in the bright highlights. The big idea is that you want to start the capture-t o-final form (print or web based) process with as much usable information as possible.

Jose Angel , Jul 02, 2008; 01:40 p.m.

If you like to see how it looks on a real shot (in this case D200 vs S5), check it here.

Frank Skomial , Jul 02, 2008; 02:25 p.m.

Link provided by Todd, the DPREVIEW, shows Canon 5D has the same "usable range" DR as D200, and they differ a lot in size of pixels, perhaps as much as D200 and D700 ?

Possibly D700 will have better DR, but the usable portion of it could be ?

Dave Lee , Jul 02, 2008; 05:12 p.m.

If you want high dynamic range, get a Fuji S2, S3 or S5. They all beat any Nikon SLR.

Eric Arnold , Jul 02, 2008; 05:28 p.m.

basically, the D700 is a D3 in a D300 body. so it will have the same DR differences as D3 and D200.

i'd go with Ellis' estimate of a two-stop gap in real-world terms.

but if DR is all you care about, get a S5 or a Sigma DP14/DP1. if you want the total package and ultimate versatility, go with nikon.

Robert Budding , Jul 02, 2008; 07:32 p.m.

Jose - who asked about the Fuji S5? Besides, your test looks seriosly flawed because you've clearly under exposed the D200 shot.


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