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Shutter actuation count easily reset?

Jeff Hsu , Sep 24, 2010; 09:23 p.m.

I've been looking to purchase a used D700 in South Korea due to the exchange rate working in my favor. I saw a used D700 for 2,000,000KRW (approx. $1,750), and upon inspection the camera looked great. I took a photo and uploaded it to my computer, and found that shutter actuations were at 3,474, which is quite low considering I found D700s at other stores selling for 2,250,000KRW used with 20,000+ actuations. However, the file name of the image file was 700_5704.jpg, making me wonder how the image file sequence exceeded that of the shutter actuations in the EXIF. Is it possible to artificially set the file name sequence to begin at a higher number than 0? Or is it possible that the shutter actuation count was somehow hacked and reset? I understand that shutter count certainly isn't everything, but this does concern me a bit before I make the leap of faith and drop what is to me a significant deal of money. Any help would be most appreciated!

Responses

Shun Cheung , Sep 24, 2010; 09:30 p.m.

The file name number means nothing. You can manually use some number as the file name, copy that file onto the CF card, and the camera will increment that number for the next image file name. That can easily be manipulated.

Nikon can certainly reset the shutter actuation count. However, it is not so easy for an individual to do that, but clearly that is possible with the right tool or the right hack.

Dave Lee , Sep 24, 2010; 09:31 p.m.

You can check the overall count with the free exif viewer, Opanda. Alternatively, on the Mac, you can read it with Preview. This number, contained in the exif information, can not be reset as far as I know. 3474 is very low for a D700, at at $1750, sounds like you got a great deal.

Jon Porter , Sep 24, 2010; 10:25 p.m.

That's not an unrealistically low number. My 15-month-old D700 only has 3,757 releases due to a combination of moderate amounts of shooting spread among numerous cameras. (My nine-month-old D3000 has 1,102 shutter actuations.) Since most D700 owners also have at least one other camera, it shouldn't be rare to find used D700 bodies with low shutter counts.

Theodore Papageorgiou , Sep 25, 2010; 03:50 a.m.

I have a Win 7 computer,with Firefox.What should I do to learn how many shutter actuations has my F5?
Can I use this Opanda program and how?

Douglas Lee , Sep 25, 2010; 08:24 a.m.

The F5 is a film camera. Therefore, no EXIF data. I don't think it is possible to determine shutter actuations (sp).

Mag Miksch , Sep 25, 2010; 08:32 a.m.

Exif data are written with digital files, so it will not work with a F5

Joseph Wisniewski , Sep 25, 2010; 05:37 p.m.

F5 logs shutter count, and it can be queried through the 10 pin shutter connection. Not sure if Nikon PhotoSecretary can do it, but it's in the memory map.

Kelly Flanigan , Sep 25, 2010; 06:45 p.m.

Both the Nikon F5 and F6 record shutter count; so do F90x and N90s too.

Having a shutter count tally really has nothing to do if a camera is digital(sensor based; ie non film); it is if the shutter is electronically controlled and the makers add the software hooks to record "clicks".

Thus some modern film cameras with electronic shutters record shutter clicks.

About anything can be hacked. Saying it is not possible is raw fuel to inspire a hacker.

I have friends who use the EXIF tools to read their shutter clicks; like it is some massive thing to worry about. On guys camera reads only a few thisuand clicks; and he bought it brand new; by a crude estimate it seems low by a factor of 10 to 20; thus I wonder if some glitch reset the counter' or it rolled over. He is not the hacker type; thus it is puzzling.

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