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Picture Control Setting on my new Nikon D7000 ..

Cory Reynolds , Jul 09, 2011; 06:19 p.m.

I just bought a new nikon D7000 a week ago. So far i do like it! I have been reading the manual and going out and taking pictures. I have read about the Picture Control Settings? What are the best setting to use on my camera? I heard the vivid setting is the best one to change and use. Thanks for all your help.

Cory

Responses


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Peter Hamm , Jul 09, 2011; 06:44 p.m.

best settings are different for everybody. You should do some experimentation and find out for yourself.

Don't believe everything Ken Rockwell says about super-vivid images, they don't work for everybody.

Robert Hooper , Jul 09, 2011; 07:01 p.m.

Use the default settings until you get a feel for the baseline performance of the camera. Then allow your creative juices to flow and start tweaking Picture Control accordingly. I usually start with sharpening. Undoubtedly, you will choose different settings in Picture Control for different shooting situations; portraits vs landscape, etc.

Luke Kaven , Jul 09, 2011; 07:05 p.m.

To get the most out of your camera, shoot RAW and experiment during capture using NX with the different picture controls. Sometimes you will want "neutral" if you are doing post-processing, and sometimes otherwise. There is a lot of information in those RAW files, more with each generation of new camera. Learning how to exploit it is half the fun.

David L , Jul 09, 2011; 08:07 p.m.

I found the jpeg files from mine look great with little need for improvements. The Active D-Lighting does a very good job, so good that I can't easily duplicate the effect in Adobe Camera Raw converter. All I've done to the standard settings is bump the sharpness up a little bit.

Errol Young - Toronto, ON, CA , Jul 09, 2011; 08:55 p.m.

I have concluded that I want JPGs made as 'flat' as possible so that I can boost colour, exposure and sharpening in PS.
I use D300 and D3100

Joseph Smith , Jul 09, 2011; 09:25 p.m.

Each shooting situation may require its own unique set of settings. If you shoot in RAW or NEF, you can make all of the adjustments in Capture NX2 during post processing. If you shoot in JPEG, and want to minimize your post processing time, then you should learn how to set Picture Controls to get the best JPEG as possible "in camera." A landscape scene taken with great sun at your back will require different settings than portraits taken in overcast light. As a former slide shooter, I try and get it right in the camera. I encourage you to do the same. Go here for more info:
http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/microsite/picturecontrol/index.htm
Check Thom Hogan's site to see if he has info on how to best use Picture Controls. Many of the settings on other Nikon bodies will probably apply to your camera.
Joe Smith

Pierre Lachaine , Jul 09, 2011; 10:32 p.m.

Forget other people's picture control preferences. It's a very individual thing, and it can even depend on what lens you are using when you take the picture. For example, while I have nothing remotely as nice as a D7000, on my lowly less-than-consumer Nikon, I use Standard for the cheap kit zoom, and Neutral for my much more contrasty prime lens.

The quickest way by far to get up to speed is to experiment with the Picture Controls on your computer rather than with the camera. Set anything you want in the camera, but start out shooting raw. That way, you can use any of the same picture controls in the free copy of ViewNX 2 you should have (or can download), and you can change them at will to see what you like most -- no matter what was set in the camera. Once you know, then you can just set the camera's picture controls the same way and shoot JPEG from then on if you want to.

Personally, I don't know why anyone would want Vivid, though. But like I said, it's a matter of personal preference.

Chris Wick , Jul 10, 2011; 07:34 a.m.

+1 for Pierre's view.

Try taking a RAW (NEF) picture which is representative of what you normally shoot; load it into View NX2; try the different picture controls; then set your camera to your favorite. Over time you can learn to adjust in camera for different lenses/subjects/lighting.

Personally I leave my D90 on the neutral picture setting, and then choose the most appropriate picture control in Capture NX2 or View NX2. Of course this only works if you take NEFs. I find I rarely change it, although sometimes vivid is good for very colourful scenes. Otherwise I hate it.

Chris

Errol Young - Toronto, ON, CA , Jul 10, 2011; 09:31 a.m.

Pierre
I use vivid in my D70 when I shoot a Santa Claus thing in a mall. I print pics from the computer using Capture and only adapt the file when absolutely necessary. Other than that, you are correct. Shoot flat, change on the computer.


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