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Studio lighting for beginners

Black Swan , Jul 12, 2004; 11:53 p.m.

Hello Im interested in purchasing studio lighting for fashion shoots. I have read many books but it seems really complicated. I guess it would seem easier once I actually start doing it. Are there any good kits that can purchased that are not so expensive? I wont be shooting more than one model at a time, so I guess a whole lot of light wont be needed. Also im cosidering purchasing a Canon digital rebel and was wondering if this was a good camera for studio flash?


Jochen Schrey , Jul 13, 2004; 10:34 a.m.

Oops! You ask the hardest question imaginable! Fashion, cheap & beginner don't match. As a beginner you need strong modelling lights, not 75W like in the most cheapos. If you want to use the winder of the 300D you'll need modern and expensive units too. I myself couldn't afford them so I use old and slow elinchrom Quanta. Only good thing I can tell you is you'll get along with less than 1200Ws totally. ( Ican't go below so I'm shooting products with a ND filter). The D300 has no pc socket. Either you use a hotshoe adapter or a infrared or radio trigger. I used my *istD with hotshoe adapter because I didn't discover the pc socket and can't complain about it.

Luis Alvarez , Jul 13, 2004; 12:23 p.m.

Hi, I'm also a "newbie" at this, so I begun with an economic kit that I purchased at E-bay, It's very complete, It has three strobes with stands for each, one umbrella and two small softboxes, also it has an infrared hotshoe triger, sync cables, Two back drops and more. All that for $289.00 shipping not included. You can see this item by clicking here. I also have a Digital Rebel, and below you can see one of the pictures that I have been able to take with this kit.

I'm lucky to have a wife that serves as my model.

Melissa Eiselein , Jul 13, 2004; 01:15 p.m.

And your wife is a very pretty model, Luis.
I can't get my teenage son to sit for me while I try to learn lighting techniques. He hates having his picture taken so much that even our vacation pictures are filled with scowls. So, so a couple days ago, I bought a cheap wig and nice wig mannequin on eBay. At least she will smile when I take her picture. And she won't complain about sitting still for too long. I think I'll name her Madeline.

Black Swan: Have you checked out the following threads?

Wee Keng_Hor , Jul 18, 2004; 02:54 a.m.

Just an aternative to the conventional studio lighting system:

You may consider using Canon EX flashes together with softboxes/umbrellas and reflectors as your studio lighting tools. This will be a very portable and verstitle tools. The 550EX should be powerful enough to give u pretty good results for head and chest shots when used with a small softbox.

Digital Rebel will not allow u to use flash ratio but u can always set them manually. With instant feedback from the LCD, u can always adjust your exposure without relying on any flash meters.

Photek Background-in-a-bag, 2 X 550EX + Chemera Softbox, 300D

Alex B. , Jul 22, 2004; 02:27 p.m.

It's a bueatiful kid and perfect shot! Can you specify size of softboxes? And your setup for this shot?

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