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New PocketWizard IIIs Announced

Mark Sanderson , Feb 20, 2012; 03:33 p.m.

Responses

Peter J , Feb 20, 2012; 06:54 p.m.

Worth buying the Pocket Wizard Plus II's (if that's all you need) as they drop in price. But, I would go for the Plus III's if the improvements are in line with your needs.

Ilkka Nissila , Feb 24, 2012; 04:22 p.m.

What I do not understand is why manufacturers make flashes and triggers that do not allow output (flash light energy) to be controlled centrally from the transmitter on the camera. And then expect significant money to be paid for such systems. I just don't get it. In my opinion the community would greatly benefit from some kind of control standard to be made for flash units so that a kind of "all-in-one" controller/trigger system can be manufactured, and the flash output of all (compatible) brands of flashes controlled from a nice panel with LCD/LED display etc. Also high-speed sync capabilities should have standardized interface as well.

Marc Williams , Feb 25, 2012; 06:24 a.m.

Good question Ilkka ... but in fact many makers DO offer levels control from the camera.

Not sure, but I think each manufacturer has to apply for radio frequencies with the various governments, and that may have some affect on the subject of "unification".

However, as mentioned, many strobe makers have made significant progress with on-camera transmitters that provide levels control ... Elinchrom has it, Hensel has it, Profoto AIR has it, Broncolor RFS has it, and I think Paul C Buff has it ... and there may be more.

Makers like Profoto have not yet converted all of their packs to also include AIR levels control, which probably is due to the fact that these boxes are still analog ... using rocker switches and click stop dials. Until those go to digital controls, they probably can only be triggered by radio.

Currently, Hensel has three different radio systems in their new Porty Lith battery pack units, Expert line of monoheads and their Nova D AC packs, (Profoto AIR, Hensel's Strobe Wizard, and FreeMask receivers are all built into these units). This allows those with older Hensel units to use Strobe Wizard transmitters with levels control of all units new or old ... and those using Profoto AIR controlled equipment can now mix in Hensel solutions and use the same AIR radio transmitter to control all of the lighting levels.

I think the Strobists blog entry does a good job of explaining why there is still value to a robust, simple "dumb" trigger like the new PW-III.

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