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How to provide an 8x10 with a 3:2 aspect ratio?

Tracie Howe , Jul 29, 2011; 02:16 p.m.

I'm currently including a few prints in my base wedding price. I give the bride the option to choose which sizes she wants, up to an 8x10. How do you provide an 8x10 (16x20, etc) if something major has to be cropped out? Do you simply put a white border on each side? Do you shoot wide and compose later? I don't like the idea of those options, but I can't see any way around this.

Responses


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Alex DC , Jul 29, 2011; 02:25 p.m.

There is no way around it, unless you offer 8x12" rather than 8x10". The aspect ratio is fixed.
Personally, I shoot wide, and loose, in order to allow for cropping.

al morris , Jul 29, 2011; 02:36 p.m.

+1 Alex DC. Don't offer 8x10, offer 8x12. Too many headaches.

Matt Laur , Jul 29, 2011; 02:48 p.m.

Just tell them that the important parts of the image demand a 2x3 aspect ratio, and than they're either looking at an 8x12, or they'll just need to cut a mat window that favors a slightly less-than-8x10 image on an 8x10 piece of paper. It's one or the other, and no big deal.

If they want to be able to drop the image into an off-the-shelf 8x10 frame, then something has to give. If the image will be ruined by copping, then they need to go to an 11x14 frame, and you just print your 2:3 image on an 11x14 piece of paper. The margins can work out very close to being even. Like this:


And who doesn't like an 11x14 frame? They're easy to come by, inexpensively.

Tracie Howe , Jul 29, 2011; 08:10 p.m.

I just assume that people are most familiar with an 8x10, and would rather have that. Probably for ease of framing something themselves. I guess I could offer an 8x12 as a solution. I do explain the aspect ratio to people in the beginning, and I even have visual aids. They probably tune it out though. :)

Thanks for your input everyone!

William Clark , Jul 29, 2011; 09:07 p.m.

Try:

Content Aware Scale

It's in PS.

Or when you make the photo allow enough room so as it can be cropped into an 8/10, 11/14 and so on.
Hope this helps you.

Vail Fucci , Jul 29, 2011; 11:07 p.m.

If they don't get the aspect ratio, instead offer something a bit cheesy like their names in nice font on the sides so you can have content added to the short sides, or just do bars on either side in a complimentary color, like black or eye dropper some color from the shot like the wedding color. 8x12 frames aren't nearly as available as 8x10s.

John H. , Jul 30, 2011; 10:15 a.m.

Don't offer 8x10, offer 8x12. Too many headaches.

Don't like headaches? Just wait to the client complains about the 8x12 not fitting in to the common sized frames.

William W , Jul 30, 2011; 10:31 a.m.

I just assume that people are most familiar with an 8x10, and would rather have that. Probably for ease of framing something themselves. I guess I could offer an 8x12 as a solution. I do explain the aspect ratio to people in the beginning, and I even have visual aids. They probably tune it out though. :)

Yes. The Clients are generally not interested in the technical stuff.
Shoot wide and accommodate the customer’s requirements: stated; implied and assumed.

OR

“I give the bride the option to choose which sizes she wants, up to an 8x10”

Offer a very precise and very defined product, only.

The point is, if you are offering a 8 x 10, in you package: then you really do have to shoot to accommodate that request, should it be demanded of you.

WW

Richard Snow , Jul 30, 2011; 12:56 p.m.

One final option that hasn't been outright mentioned, but has been skirted around, is to print the image as an 8x12 and then frame and mat the image yourself in an 11x14 frame. Any arts and crafts store will have 11x14 frames in a variety of colors and designs. Something simple and elegant, (3/4" -1" frame in black or ash), with a white (or white with black core; or double mat white outer/black inner) should only run you about $15-$25. Consider it a learned lesson and next time shoot loose so you can crop to 8x10.

RS


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